Academic Minute

Academic Minute

Inside Higher Ed is pleased to bring you The Academic Minute. The brainchild of Albany's WAMC and its president, Alan Chartock, The Academic Minute features professors from top institutions around the country, delving into topics from the serious to the light-hearted, keeping listeners abreast of what's new and exciting in the academy with topics ranging from updates on groundbreaking scientific research to an explanation of how the board game Monopoly can help explain the economic recession.

The Academic Minute features a different professor every day, drawing experts from institutions within WAMC's listening area and across the country. Each segment is introduced by Lynn Pasquerella, president of Mount Holyoke College. Pasquerella is also a professor of philosophy at Mount Holyoke, specializing in medical and legal ethics.

Are you a professor who would like to record an Academic Minute? Let us know about your latest research at academicminute@wamc.org

The Theme: The Academic Minute opens with a selection by WAMC contributor and renowned cellist Yehuda Hanani, who appears on Classical Music According to Yehuda during The Roundtable. The piece is Bach's Suite No. 2 in D Minor.

Production support for The Academic Minute comes from Newman's Own Foundation in partnership with Mount Holyoke College.

PROGRAMS

July 31, 2014
In today's Academic Minute, Concordia University's Peter Jaskiewicz discusses how tightly held family businesses -- which often fill leadership jobs internally -- might benefit from outside hires.
July 30, 2014
Some people are inherently pessimistic. Others tend to focus on the positive and maintain a sunny optimism. In today's Academic Minute, Michigan State University's Jason Moser digs into the science of this aspect of human nature.
July 29, 2014
Yawns are something of a physiological mystery. In today's Academic Minute, Duke University's Elizabeth Cirulli attempts to unravel the confusion surrounding yawns.

Archive

July 21, 2011
In today’s Academic Minute, SUNY Cobleskill's Ed Stander examines why astronomers must consider scale when applying the laws of physics to any object beyond Earth. Stander is a professor of geology, astronomy, and environmental sciences at SUNY Cobleskill. Find out more about him here.
July 20, 2011
In today’s Academic Minute, Lock Haven University's Daniela Ribitsch explains Arthur Schnitzler’s pioneering use of inner monologue as a literary device. Ribitsch studied at Karl Franzens Universität in her home town of Graz, Austria, and is instructor of German at Lycoming College and, in 2010-11, was assistant professor of German at Lock Haven.
July 19, 2011
In today’s Academic Minute, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute's Francine Berman discusses our growing need to store massive amounts of digital data and the problems we face in keeping our data accessible as storage formats change. Berman is vice president for research and professor of computer science at RPI. Find out more about her here.
July 15, 2011
n today’s Academic Minute, Cornell University's John Fitzpatrick discusses what we can learn about climate change by observing Snowy Owls. Fitzpatrick is executive director of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in Ithaca, N.Y. Find out more about him here.
July 14, 2011
In today’s Academic Minute, the University of Texas at Austin's Timothy Rowe examines how the sense of smell contributed to the development of larger brains in early mammals and how modern technology is making such determinations possible. Rowe is a professor in the Department of Geological Sciences in UT-Austin's Jackson School of Geosciences and director of the Vertebrate Paleontology Laboratory of the Texas Memorial Museum. Find out more about him here.

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