administrators

UMass System's New Way to Track Its Performance

The University of Massachusetts System has adopted a new reporting mechanism on its progress in meeting state goals, and will replace a long report that few read with a simple brochure, The Boston Globe reported. The brochure will feature 21 broad goals, with a simple indication (not letter grades, but perhaps up and down arrows) of progress or lack thereof. Some campus officials opposed the new system, fearing it would oversimplify. But system officials said that this approach is important to promote transparency about how state funds are used.

 

Wealthy American Universities Start to Invest in Africa

Some of the wealthiest American universities are starting to invest in Africa, seeing the potential for large gains, Reuters reported. Northwestern University, with holdings in companies in Kenya and Nigeria, recently doubled its African investments. Other large endowments investing in Africa include those of the Universities of Michigan, Notre Dame, Texas and Wisconsin. Rockefeller University is expected to make such an investment this year.

 

New presidents provosts Bunker Hill Cedarville Claremont ISU Jamestown Ventura WNMU Youngstown

Smart Title: 
  • William Crocker, vice president of academic quality and success at State College of Florida-Manatee/Sarasota, has been selected as vice president for academic affairs and provost at Western New Mexico University.

Tech start-up helping colleges institutionalize voter registration on campus

Section: 
Smart Title: 

Colleges are partnering with a tech startup that aims to make voting and voter registration a no-brainer.

How will colleges respond to extra year on health insurance requirement?

Section: 
Smart Title: 

Could delay in health coverage requirement change the way many colleges have been limiting adjunct hours?

Journalism Center Will Remain on UW-Madison Campus

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker vetoed a budget provision on Sunday that would have kicked the Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism off of the University of Wisconsin’s campus and barred any university employee from working with the nonprofit group. Walker said since the journalism center is a private group, relationships between it and the university should be addressed by the University of Wisconsin Board of Regents, not lawmakers in the state budget, according to the Journal Sentinel. The veto comes as a relief to Greg Downey, the director of the School of Journalism at UW-Madison, who fought to reverse the Joint Finance Committee’s budget provision after it was introduced in early June. On his blog, Downey wrote a blog post titled “Ten things to consider if you find your research, teaching, or service under political attack,” in which he explains the lessons he learned from this experience.

 

Ad keywords: 

Essay on how to do strategic planning

Patrick Sanaghan and Mary Hinton consider how colleges can gain the most from an important -- and potentially difficult -- process.

Editorial Tags: 
Show on Jobs site: 

Chancellor resigns at Yeshiva University, apologizing for mishandling of sex abuse cases

Smart Title: 

Chancellor of university retires, admitting that he mishandled allegations of sex abuse against boys at the institution's high school in the 1970s and 1980s.

The many roles (and expectations) for college presidents (essay)

Boxer, minister, police officer, psychologist, Nobel laureate: K. Johnson Bowles considers the traits and expectations campuses hold for their leaders.

 

Ad keywords: 
Section: 
Editorial Tags: 
Show on Jobs site: 

Poll: Job Success Most Valued Factor in Picking Colleges

A new Gallup Poll has found that the factor adult Americans are most likely to say is most important in selecting a college is the percentage of graduates who are able to find a good job. That factor was picked by 41 percent of those polled, followed by the price of the college (37 percent) and graduation rates (16 percent). The wealthier that respondents were, the more likely they were to say that the job success of graduates was the most important factor.

The same poll also asked questions about tuition.

Asked if higher tuition rates meant that the quality of the college was higher, 25 percent strongly disagreed and another 20 percent disagreed. Only 10 percent strongly agreed, with another 13 percent agreeing.

Gallup also asked what amount would be affordable for one year of full-time tuition (not counting room, board or books). Two percent said no tuition was affordable, 15 percent said less than $5,000, 18 percent said $5,000 to less than $10,000, 26 percent said $10,000 to less than $20,000, 10 percent said $20,000 to less than $30,000, and 5 percent said $30,000 or more. 

Disclosure: Inside Higher Ed works with Gallup on our survey projects, although Inside Higher Ed was not involved with this poll. The trends found by Gallup in this poll of all adults somewhat mirror the results of an Inside Higher Ed poll conduct by Gallup of the parents of high school and junior high school students.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - administrators
Back to Top