admissions

N.J. Poised to Approve In-State Tuition to Undocumented Students

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, a Republican, and Democratic legislative leaders have reached an agreement that should pave the way for the state's public colleges and universities to charge in-state tuition to students who lack the legal documentation to reside in the United States, The New York Times reported. Christie appeared last year -- when running for re-election -- to back the idea, but he has been ambivalent of late, leaving many to wonder if he could support the bill. Under the compromise, the governor has said he will sign the bill as long as it is amended to deny state financial aid to the undocumented students.

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American Bar Association approves experimental hybrid J.D. program

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William Mitchell College of Law receives a rare approval from the American Bar Association to experiment with online education.

2,500 Get False Acceptance Emails From Fordham

About 2,500 applicants to Fordham University were incorrectly told this week that they had been admitted, when in reality 500 of them had been rejected and another 2,000 had been deferred, The New York Times reported. The notification came with information about financial aid notices and arrived two days before the applicants had expected to hear from the university. The emails came from Student Aid Services, a contractor working with the university. Both the company and the university have apologized and said that they are trying to figure out what happened.

 

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Georgia Tech admits first cohort ahead of online master's degree program launch

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AT&T employees, men and domestic students dominate the first cohort of Georgia Tech's new fully online master's degree program.

Enrollments Dip for 2nd Year; For-Profits Drop Sharply

Overall enrollment in higher education fell by 1.5 percent in fall 2013, marking the second consecutive year of decline, the National Student Clearinghouse estimated Thursday in a report. Enrollments edged up over fall 2012 at four-year private and public institutions, by 1.3 and 0.3 percent, respectively, but dropped by 3.1 and 9.7 percent at community colleges and four-year for-profit institutions, the clearinghouse report said. No region gained students in year-over-year numbers, but the Midwest (-2.6 percent) suffered most with the other regions dipping by less than a percentage point. 

The report also provides data on enrollments by state and gender, among other counts.

What's Up With the Cow Stickers?

High school guidance counselors were trading emails and posting comments on listservs Wednesday about unexpected packages from the College Board containing stickers showing a cow. Many wondered why they were receiving the packages -- some were annoyed at the cost and apparent effort to promote College Board services. Others thought the College Board was showing a sense of humor. The source of the stickers? On the last PSAT, there was a question involving a cow that led to much social media discussion after the test.

 

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Haverford May Abandon Loan-Free Packages for Many Students

Haverford College officials are backing away from a pledge to ensure no students are forced to borrow money to attend the private liberal arts college.

College administrators told students this week they are looking to do away with their six-year-old “no loan” pledge to some students – mostly its students from upper middle class households. The new plan still has significant protections for needy families in lower income brackets: Families making less than $60,000 will still not have to take out loans and no family should have to borrow more than $12,000 over four-years, which is far less debt than the average debt-bearing student. (The median family income in the United States is about $51,000.)

The plan still needs the approval by the college's board, which could modify or reject the proposal by college administrators.  But Haverford seems ready to join the likes of Dartmouth and Williams Colleges, which all tried no loan programs but then abandoned them following the recession. The market blew a hole in many university endowment funds, which colleges draw on to provide financial aid.

There has been an increase in aid spending at Haverford -- which awards aid based solely on need -- but the no loan program is not entirely to blame, according to a presentation by college officials posted online by a Haverford student newspaper. Haverford spent $16.9 in financial aid in 2009 and over $23 million in 2013 – an increase of about $6.6 million per year. The no loan program cost about $1.9 million this year. 

Jess Lord, the dean of admissions and financial aid, said the college has been seeking "equilibrium" between access and affordability and long-term sustainability. 

“The truth is that we’ve been having conversations about the long-term sustainability of the financial model since 2008, since the economy took the turn that it took in 2008,” Lord said in a telephone interview Wednesday night.

The proposal to scale back the no loan program to only cover the lowest income families will save the college about $800,000 a year. For the Haverford class of 2012, which entered the college before the no loan program took effect, the average four-year debt burden was about $14,000. Nationally, the average debt burden for the class of 2012 is $29,000.

Colleges with no loan programs calculate a family's assets and use a formula to determine what they can afford to pay. The college picks up the difference between what a family can pay out of its own pocket or with scholarships and the college's price -- a gap that would either force families to borrow or send their students somewhere else. Tuition, fees and room and board at Haverford are priced at $59,000 a year.

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Transparency in agent relationships is a hot topic at meeting on international recruitment

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At American International Recruitment Council annual conference, members discuss what should be required of universities and their overseas recruitment agents vis-á-vis transparency. 

Association formed to bring standards to agency-based international recruitment looks ahead

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Using commission-based agents in international recruitment has gone from unmentionable to mainstream. At 5th annual conference, a group formed to bring standards to the practice reflects on where it has been and where it's going.

New GED Website Goes Live

Next month the GED Testing Service will launch a revamped version of the GED, which will be fully computerized and more expensive and include the assessment of college readiness. This week the testing service, which is owned jointly by Pearson and the American Council on Education, rolled out the test's new website. It includes a registration portal, study guides and information about applying for college, as well as other resources.

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