admissions

One law school reduces admissions, says that's the future of legal education

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By cutting enrollment 20 percent, the University of California Hastings College of the Law believes it's helping itself, applicants and the legal profession. Is this the future of legal education?

ETS will allow GRE takers to select which scores to report

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ETS will let grad school applicants pick which results to report. Test takers are likely to applaud the shift, but will admissions officers?

Essay how colleges and faculty can improve admissions visits

Tom Delahunt offers advice on how admissions officers – and faculty members -- can help their institutions make a good impression on would-be students.

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U. of California Admits Many More Foreign and Out-of-State Students

The number of foreign and out-of-state students admitted to the University of California's 10 campuses soared by 43 percent this year, while the overall number of would-be freshmen admitted from within the state's borders grew by just 3.6 percent, the university system said Tuesday. The university, like many public institutions, has sought to help offset budget cuts by enrolling more students who pay full tuitions, leading to increases in non-state residents in many places. Out-of-state and foreign students made up nearly one in five students admitted for next fall, 18,846 of a total of 80,289.

UCLA Mistakenly Tells Waitlisted Students They're In

The University of California at Los Angeles told 894 waitlisted students they had been admitted last weekend, only to backtrack hours later, The Los Angeles Times reported.

The college sent an e-mail about financial aid to accepted and waitlisted students. But one line that was only supposed to be on the message to accepted students also appeared in the form letter to those on the waitlist: "Once again congratulations on your admission to UCLA, we hope that this information will assist you in making your decision to join the Bruin Family in the fall," the message read. UCLA officials informed those students Monday that they were still on the waitlist, and offered an apology.

This has happened before. Vassar College mistakenly told some early decision applicants this winter that they had gotten in, only to write back telling them they were actually rejected. And, The Times reported,  the University of California campuses in San Diego and Santa Barbara have accidentally told students they were accepted in past years.

 

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More Instances of Selective SAT Score Submission for Rankings

The Record has exposed more cases of New Jersey colleges reporting incomplete information on SAT scores to U.S. News & World Report to inflate rankings. Ramapo College has been excluding about 22 percent of its new students (generally the most disadvantaged students) when reporting average SAT scores to U.S. News & World Report. As a result, the SAT average reported by Ramapo was more than 50 points higher than it should have been. New Jersey City University has also been inflating its SAT scores, the Record reported. Ramapo, shortly after the article was published Friday, said it would start reporting the averages for all students. New Jersey City University officials said that they were unaware of the practice.

 

 

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Midwestern liberal arts colleges use lacrosse to recapture suburban students

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Division III lacrosse has become a tool for Midwestern liberal arts colleges to recapture suburban students, a group central to their business strategy.

Chinese students lead increase in international graduate school applications

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More international applicants -- especially from China -- want to enroll in graduate programs in the United States.

Appeals court rejects suit seeking to end ban on affirmative action

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Federal appeals court upholds right of California to bar its public colleges from considering race and ethnicity in admissions.

Law School Objects to 'U.S. News' Declaring It 'Unranked'

The law dean of the University of St. Thomas has released an open letter to Bob Morse, the head of the college rankings of U.S. News & World Report, objecting to the magazine's decision to declare the law school "unranked." The law school was declined a ranking after it reported that it had provided both accurate and inaccurate data on its job placement rates, and the inaccurate data had been used to rank the school. Thomas M. Mengler, the dean, noted that the magazine typically does not change rankings when errors are discovered after the rankings are released -- even in cases where the information provided was intentionally incorrect. "If the decision to 'unrank' is indeed a change in protocol, this leads to the policy concern I would like to highlight – the fact that your decision will create a disincentive for law schools to promptly report mistaken or erroneous data," Mengler wrote. "When other law schools lied, you called on all law schools to protect the integrity of the data and ultimately the reporting. We did that even for an unintentional mistake. And while we are willing to live with the unfortunate consequences, I fear your decision will serve as a disincentive for others to self-report errors."

Brian Kelly, editor of the magazine, responded with a letter in which he said: "We made this decision for the 2013 law school rankings at a time of continuing conversation about law school data, both inside and outside the academy.  Some schools have been accused of publishing inaccurate or misleading data. The American Bar Association is imposing more stringent reporting rules. And at U.S. News our responsibility is to continue to provide timely and relevant information about law schools to our readers, and to make them aware of new developments or changes in information. That is what we did in this case."

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