international

Students Killed in Attack at Damascus U.

At least 12 students were killed by a mortar strike at Damascus University on Thursday, The New York Times reported. Government and rebel forces blamed one another for the attack, which took place at an outdoor café close to the civil engineering building. Students were reportedly taking an exam inside the building at the time of the strike.

Thursday’s was the second major attack on Syrian university students this year. In January, more than 80 people were killed by explosions at Aleppo University.

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Professor held jobs at same time in Canada and Britain

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How did an academic hold full-time jobs simultaneously at universities in Canada and Britain?

Britain Gets Its Second Private University

Regent's College in London has gained approval from British officials to become the second private nonprofit university in the United Kingdom, The Guardian reported. Regent's University London, as the institution will be known, will be the largest private institution in Britain, at 4,500 students. The University of Buckingham became the first private institution there, in 1983.

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Report on Impact of Financial Crisis on European Education Budgets

A new report from the European Commission examines the effect of the financial crisis on education budgets. The report shows that nearly half of the 28 countries for which data were available cut their spending on tertiary and adult education from 2010 to 2011, with the greatest decline observed in Slovakia (nearly 15 percent), and reductions of more than 5 percent in the Czech Republic, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, and Northern Ireland. In 2012, even larger cuts took place in Cyprus and Lithuania (more than 30 percent), and Greece (25 percent).

Only a few countries say that budget reductions have resulted in increased tuition fees. The report cites Spain and the United Kingdom as two countries where tuition fees are being increased “with the objective of aligning them with the real cost of studies.”

The report examines educational spending at all levels, from pre-primary to tertiary education.

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Resolving Suit, Oxford Will Review Admission Policy

The University of Oxford has agreed to review policies under which its St. Hughes College has required applicants to demonstrate -- as a condition of admission -- that they can afford the living expenses, BBC reported. The agreement resolved a suit filed by an applicant who said he was rejected when he could not demonstrate that he had that money on hand. The applicant said that the rules were a human rights violation.

 

Breakthrough for Study Abroad in Cuba

Academic Programs International has received a license from the U.S. Office of Foreign Assets Control to operate short- and long-term study abroad programs in Cuba, making it the first study abroad provider organization to announce that it had earned such approval. While regulations released back in 2011 cleared the way for U.S colleges to resume exchange programs in Cuba, the provider organizations were required to submit applications for "specific" licenses – applications that heretofore have gone unapproved. Those in the study abroad field who have been involved in discussions with U.S. government officials say they have been told to expect that other pending applications by study abroad providers will be acted upon shortly. 

"This is really an opening that will increase student participation going forward,” said Brian Whalen, president and CEO of the Forum on Education Abroad, which has been advocating on the providers’ behalf. Whalen noted that Forum data show that about 50 percent of colleges' study abroad programs are run in collaboration with providers.

“We’ll see more programs being developed, more universities being able to offer the experience to their students," he said.

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Speakers consider best practices for internationalizing highly regulated professional degree programs

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At best practices conference, panelists discuss strategies to incorporate international experiences into highly regulated degree programs like air traffic management and nursing.

Australian MOOC Platform

The University of Melbourne is a member of Coursera, one of the primary (and U.S.-based) platforms for massive open online courses. But an all-Australian MOOC platform was launched today, The Conversation reported. Several universities are already signed up to offer free courses through the platform, called Open2Study.

 

Academics in Germany rebel against rankings system

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Scholarly groups start effort, and are joined by a university in saying they will no longer participate.

'Harlem Shake' Video Leads to Oxford Librarian's Firing

Students at Oxford University are protesting administrators' decision to dismiss a librarian because she let a group of students produce a Harlem Shake video in the library of St. Hilda's College, The Independent of London reported. The student librarian, Calypso Nash, reportedly lost her job even though she was not involved in filming the video, which was recorded in seven minutes at 11:30 p.m. to minimize disruption, according to the newspaper. Many of the student participants were fined for their roles, too.

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