international

Students rally against Hungary's plans for higher education

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Students rally against government plans that leave some of them with steep tuition bills and others with requirements not to leave the country.

World Bank affiliate invests $150 million in for-profit college provider

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The International Finance Corporation, a member of the World Bank Group, invests $150 million in Laureate Education, a for-profit higher ed provider.

Australia grapples with its own Ph.D. pipeline problem

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As would-be academics pile up short-term appointments after grad school, Australia grapples with the questions of whether it is giving too many doctorates and how to employ those who receive them.

Recovery (and Tuition) for Somali Universities

Somali universities, which suffered enrollment declines during civil war, are getting back to normal, without the threats of violence that deterred many students from enrolling. But The Guardian reported that students have a new fear: tuition levels that, for some, are difficult or impossible to pay.

 

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Foreign universities consider how best to enter the MOOC market

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Non-American universities consider different options for entering the MOOC market, which to date has been dominated by elite U.S. institutions.

British Government Responds to Concerns on Syrian Students

An online petition campaign organized by Avaaz.org draws attention to the plight of Syrian students who are unable to pay tuition fees, including government-sponsored students whose tuition payments have been stopped. A statement released Friday by the Minister for Universities and Science, David Willetts, asked universities and funding agencies to exercise discretion over tuition and to use hardship funds to support students when possible. The statement notes that all institutions that enroll Syrian students through the Syrian Higher Education Capacity Building Project have agreed to waive or defer fees.

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Term Paper Ghostwriting Common in Russia

Ghostwriting of term papers is so common in Russia that those who do the work openly advertise their services, Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty reported. A woman based in Tatarstan told the news service: "Theses start from 5,000 rubles [$165]. But it depends on how much the person can pay; the price is agreed individually. I don't copy anything from the Internet and I do my research in libraries. I care about my professional reputation; I don't want to lose clients."

 

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Debate Over Christian Law School in Canada

The Council of Canadian Law Deans is opposing a proposal by Trinity Western University, an evangelical institution, to start a law school, The Vancouver Sun reported. The deans say that the accreditor for law schools in Canada should block the new institution from opening because Trinity Western's policies bar gay relationships by students or employees. Trinity Western officials said that they are entitled to hold their religious views, and also to start a law school.

 

Author of novel attacking lack of academic integrity runs an essay-writing service

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Author of novel that criticizes universities for failing to prevent cheating himself runs an essay-writing service.

Hebrew U. Considers Accepting Doctoral Theses in English

The Senate of Hebrew University of Jerusalem has been considering and is expected to vote for a proposal to allow doctoral theses to be submitted in English, Haaretz reported. While it is currently possible to obtain special permission to submit a thesis in English, the requirement is that they be submitted in Hebrew. David Aviner, a professor who is head of the Authority for Research Students in the Experimental Sciences, said the rule change reflects the need to use English because one or more committee members come from outside Israel. Further, he noted the issue of disseminating findings. "If the doctorates were written in Hebrew, two people in the hallway would read it instead of hundreds of colleagues among research groups overseas," he said.

The president of Israel's Hebrew Language Academy, Moshe Bar-Asher, sent a letter of protest to Senate members. "There's a new version of the rules, saying 'Doctorates are to be submitted in Hebrew or English,' and thus this dignified institution ... announces that the status of Hebrew has been devalued," he wrote. "In the end, studying in English will outweigh everything else, and this process will result in the teaching of English in elementary and high schools."

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