international

British publishers object to open access proposals

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Push for online publication of work supported by the government sets off a debate in the U.K. similar to the one in the U.S.

Japanese Universities Fear Loss of Young Scientists

Science leaders in Japan are warning that the country's universities are facing a shortage of young research talent, Nature reported. In the last 30 years, the number of science faculty members at state universities has grown from 50,000 to 63,000, but the number under the age of 35 has dropped from 10,000 to 6,800. Tight budgets have forced universities to limit hiring, leading to concerns about the future of science programs that aren't recruiting enough new professors.

 

 

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UNC Physics Professor Held in Argentine Jail

Paul H. Frampton, a physicist who holds an endowed chair at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is in an Argentine jail facing cocaine charges, and he is fighting both those charges and the university's decision to suspend his salary, The News & Observer of Raleigh reported. Frampton said that the cocaine was planted in his luggage, and that he is confident he will be able to show that in court. But he said he needs his salary paid, and is frustrated that it was cut off. Frampton said that Provost Bruce Carney blocked his pay out of professional jealousy. A university spokeswoman declined to say why Frampton's pay was suspended, but university officials have noted that he is not teaching as scheduled. But Frampton said he has continued to work 40-plus hours a week in prison, and has been advising his graduate students from afar (one of his advisees confirmed this).

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India Promotes Ties to Russian Universities

India is expanding its ties to Russian universities, and helping to create programs at those institutions to study India, The Hindu reported. India has just signed an agreement to create a Center of Indian Studies at Kazan Federal University, the first such India-backed institute in Russia outside of Moscow. Plans are currently under way for either chairs or research centers related to India at universities in Moscow, St. Petersburg, Vladivostok and Krasnodar.

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Controversial Higher Ed Reforms in Ecuador

Ecuador's president, Rafael Correa, is pushing a series of controversial reforms of higher education, The New York Times reported. He has added test-based admissions at the public universities and has issued evaluations that many fear could be used to shut down some private institutions, which he has termed "garage universities."

 

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Arab uprisings push U.S. students from Egypt to Lebanon

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Unrest in popular study abroad destinations for those seeking to study Arabic and Arab cultures has led more Americans to Beirut.

Chinese High School Students Aspire to Enroll in U.S.

Enrolling in college in the United States remains a top goal of students at national high schools in major Chinese cities, according to a new poll by Art & Science Group, which advises American colleges on enrollment strategies. The survey found that nearly all (94 percent) of students at these high schools are interested in college in an English-speaking country, and that 78 percent are interested in enrolling in the United States. Asked to rate the quality of colleges in the United States, Britain and Canada, the Chinese students gave the U.S. the best marks for academic quality, teaching critical thinking, the quality of facilities and prestige. Britain was on top in campus beauty and an emphasis on the liberal arts. (The scores were quite close for most categories.) Asked to identify challenges to study in the United States, 45 percent worried that they might not be academically prepared, 37 percent said that they didn't know enough about American colleges and universities, 28 percent said that they were concerned about their English skills, 25 percent worried about being far from home and 21 percent worried about whether their families could afford it.

Anger Over Selection of Non-Academic to Lead U. of Haifa

Many academics in Israel are angry over the selection of a business executive, Amos Shapira, as president of the University of Haifa, Haaretz reported. Supporters of the pick have argued that the university needs a leader who will promote change. But many in Israel believe that presidencies should go to academics. Danny Gutwein, a professor of Jewish history at Haifa, called Shapira's selection a step in "the Finance Ministry's hostile takeover of the universities." He rejected the idea that the business perspective is needed. "The premise that a commercial-business administration will rescue the universities is an addictive bit of propaganda," he said. "Essentially, as a consequence of the budget cuts the Finance Ministry forced on the universities, they have been administered as a 'business' for about two decades. And yet, experience shows that the more the universities adopt business logic, the greater the crisis in which they find themselves."

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Smith Will Help Launch Women's University in Malaysia

Smith College will be the chief academic planning partner with a group creating a women's university in Malaysia, tentatively called the Asian Women's Leadership University. The new institution is being founded as a nonprofit by three Smith alumnae. Starting in 1916, Smith supported a then young women's institution in China, Ginling College.

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Study finds little payoff of British investment in teaching centers

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British government's major investment in initiative to improve university teaching failed to raise standards, a study finds.

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