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April 24, 2014
You may be surprised to learn of the widespread uses of helium. In today’s Academic Minute, the University of Connecticut's Nicholas Leadbeater explains the wide application of this chemical element and why its days of filling party balloons may be coming to an end.

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Archive

April 15, 2014
Maybe you should let your children play with their food! In today’s Academic Minute, the University of Iowa's Larissa Samuelson asserts that playing with one's food might be a beneficial part of the learning process.
April 14, 2014
The feeling of gratitude can positively influence all the other factors of one's life. In today’s Academic Minute, Hofstra University's Jeffrey Froh describes the far reaching effects that gratitude has on children.
April 11, 2014
Studying how insects metabolize and process oxygen could bring some relief for farmers hoping to protect their crops without using dangerous pesticides. In today’s Academic Minute, Union College's Scott Kirkton discusses the biochemistry that triggers a grasshopper's molting process.
April 10, 2014
The clarity of one's memories is referred to as memory resolution. In today’s Academic Minute, Vanderbilt University's Phillip Ko explores the sharpness of memory to better understand the aging of the brain, memory loss and diseases like Alzheimer's.
April 9, 2014
Studying the DNA of the ancient Amborella flower is opening up new insights into the evolution of certain plants and animals. In today’s Academic Minute, the University of Buffalo's Victor Albert looks at the ancient origins of this Amborella and works to sequence its genome in order to better understand how life has developed on Earth.

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