Law, Policy -- and IT?

Law, Policy -- and IT?

Tracy Mitrano explores the intersection where higher education, the Internet and the world meet (and sometimes collide).

September 13, 2011 - 8:45am
  [This blog post is the second in a third on the Patriot Act article extract.]
September 9, 2011 - 8:45am
[This section below follows an introduction to the overarching subject of privacy as a matter of law, social norms and culture in the United States. It is the first of the three posts on the USA-Patriot Act extracted from a longer article. Note that this section raises the question of whether the Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986 should be amended for its failure to map Internet technology to Fourth Amendment jurisprudence.]  
September 7, 2011 - 9:45am
The cool, rainy front that has moved into our area signals the end of summer! Transition times are here, and I have one to announce to you. The Institute for Computer Policy and Law, which for the last 10 (of its 16) years has been in collaboration with EDUCAUSE, is going it alone and with a new direction. This year the title of our program is: ICPL: Internet Culture and the Academy
August 28, 2011 - 5:00pm
I confess: I am a (tempered) Wendy Wasserstein fan. I downloaded the new biography of her within minutes of reading the review. The title is completely off, IMHO, but it is a good read. Why do I care? As a junior in college (1980), my drinking buddy and I were in the student commons (drinking age being 18 in those days, I was 20) when we saw an auditions sign up sheet for a play I had never heard of: Uncommon Women and Others. Being the feminists we fancied ourselves to be, we gravitated to the title, and in our less than sober state put our names on the slotted list.
August 18, 2011 - 12:00pm
Two headlines this week on the subject of scholarly publications grabbed my attention this week, so I thought I would share them with you. The first was the article in Nature by Paul Ginspar. Anne Kenney, Cornell University Librarian, summed up the significance of his work perfectly:
July 28, 2011 - 9:15am
Evidently, Larry Page of Google "once considered accepting goats as a legitimate form of payment from those seeking to buy Google ads in Uzbekistan" according to Evgeny Morozov who has a review of Steven Levy and Sia Vaidhyanathan's respective books on Google, "In the Plex" and "The Googlization of Everything" in the latest issue of The New Republic. Hence Morozov's conclusion that:
July 18, 2011 - 7:45am
One year has passed since I began this blog. I know that without looking at a calendar because this week is the Institute for Computer Policy and Law. I started the blog with the conference in 2010. In commemoration of this anniversary, I express my heartfelt gratitude to Doug and Scott at IHE for this opportunity. Writing this blog has often been the most rewarding experience in my work life over this past year.
July 14, 2011 - 8:15am
[I have wonderful students in the course I am teaching this summer! This student has commented on Quero, the project that E.U. brought to counteract the perceived U.S. cultural bias of Google. The project died, which the student notes, with this conclusion: "It must be that the Free Market in the US and the more relaxed regulation better favors innovation and success. It might be that Europe is better at regulating Internet and new Technology but it seems it might be the case that there would not be much to regulate without the innovative market from the US."

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