Books and Publishing

Books and Publishing
Aug 28, 2018
An online textbook priced at almost $1,000 has infuriated students trying to navigate an already confusing textbook marketplace, but Louisiana-Lafayette officials insist they had "good intentions."
New book looks at “who changes, how much and into what” with influx of Chinese students into U.S. universities and at the underground learning networks students cultivate.
Using a database of 750 cases of research fraud from around the world, professors examine fraud as a phenomenon, tracing its history and trajectory and looking at what can be done about it.
Scott McLemee reviews Bible Nation by Candida R. Moss and Joel S. Baden, which chronicles the founding and development of the new Museum of the Bible in Washington.
New book explores how colleges were not created equal -- and how pressures have driven them to be even less so in recent decades.
Scott McLemee reviews The Acceleration of Cultural Change: From Ancestors to Algorithms, in which social networks, big data, memes and the like are presented as extreme cases of the creative and disruptive potentials or our tool-oriented species.
Scott McLemee examines The Trump Presidency: Outsider in the Oval Office, the first book about Trump's first year in office to be published by a scholarly press.
Editors discuss new book about a push by many Christian colleges to diversify their institutions.
Hundreds of colleges are signing on to publishers’ programs, with apparent savings to students. Some applaud the movement, while others are skeptical.
New book by a former professor looks at the tensions and struggles behind what author describes as Georgetown’s “bold, important and interesting” experiment to bring American liberal education to Qatar.
In We Demand: The University and Student Protests, Roderick A. Ferguson's understanding of the campus activism of the 1960s and ’70s rests on a clear sense of the university as a crucial part of the social machine, writes Scott McLemee.
The emerging model of openly licensed educational content makes pedagogical as well as financial sense for today’s higher education market, fostering inclusivity and knocking down the wall between writer and reader, writes Brian Jacobs.
Author discusses how college diversity programs can result in students overattributing success to factors like merit and hard work, while ignoring systemic or institutional problems.

Pages

Booklets

"The OER Moment" is Inside Higher Ed's new print-on-demand compilation of articles.

This collection of news and opinion articles may be downloaded here, free.

On Tuesday, July 18, Inside Higher Ed's editors presented a free webcast to discuss the themes of the compilation. You may view a recording of the webcast here.

This compendium was made possible in part by the financial support of Cengage.

What Others Are Reading

  • Viewed
  • Past:
  • Day
  • Week
  • Month
  • Year
Back to Top