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Quick Takes: Foundation Guidelines, Threat Against Grinnell, Football Mayhem, Cereal at Harvard

March 28, 2005
  • Two higher education groups have jointly developed a model agreement for public colleges and universities to use in creating relationships with affiliated foundations. Topics covered include fund raising responsibilities, endowment and records management, and paying for fund raising costs. The agreement is being issued a time that several college foundations have faced demands that they release more information to the public. The agreement was developed by the Council for Advancement and Support of Education and the Association of Governing Boards of Colleges and Universities.
  • A Grinnell College student was arrested Thursday night in Wisconsin, on charges of felony terrorism related to accusations that he had sent threatening communications to the college, the Associated Press reported. Authorities told the AP that Paul Wainwright had threatened to return from spring break to the Iowa college armed with weapons and with a plan to create bloodshed. The AP said that Wainwright was being held in Wisconsin, pending extradition.
  • Sixteen students at Indiana University of Pennsylvania -- including 11 members of the football team -- were arrested last week for allegedly assaulting six students while trashing an off-campus house, The Indiana Gazette reported. According to the newspaper, authorities said that the attack on the house was in retaliation for an earlier assault on one of the members of the football team. The charges that led to last week's arrests number 98, including 33 felonies. The head football coach at the university told the newspaper, "We have cooperated with the police and we will let the judicial process handle it."
  • Life is rough in Cambridge. Many Harvard University students are upset that the university has removed familar names -- such as Fruit Loops and Cap'n Crunch -- and replaced them with healthier, unknown brands, The Boston Globe reported Saturday. One student told The Globe: "I used to eat Lucky Charms for lunch and dinner. The fake stuff gets real soggy, and I've just stopped eating cereal. This is not fair."
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