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Quick Takes: Pinter Wins Nobel in Literature, Student Debt Worries Presidents, Company Barred From Stealing SAT, Ga. Tech Freshman Confesses to Bombing, Meningitis Death in Texas, U. of Washington Halts Research Study

Quick Takes: Pinter Wins Nobel in Literature, Student Debt Worries Presidents, Company Barred From Stealing SAT, Ga. Tech Freshman Confesses to Bombing, Meningitis Death in Texas, U. of Washington Halts Research Study
October 13, 2005
  • The Nobel Prize in Literature was awarded Thursday to Harold Pinter, "who in his plays uncovers the precipice under everyday prattle and forces entry into oppression's closed rooms."
  • Levels of student debt worry 86 percent of college presidents, according to a survey published Wednesday on a new Web site, the Project on Student Debt, designed to focus attention on the growing reliance on loans to pay for higher education.
  • A federal judge last week granted a temporary restraining order to the College Board, barring a Santa Monica-based company from encouraging students to steal copies of the SAT and to sell them to the company, The Los Angeles Times reported.
  • A freshman at the Georgia Institute of Technology has taken responsibility for the placement of three explosive devices that were found on the campus on Monday. The institute announced that the student has been suspended and that he faces charges in state court of reckless conduct and posession of a desctructive device. The student was not affiliated with any terrorist group.
  • A student at Tyler Junior College, in Tyler, Tex., died Monday from bacterial meningitis, the college announced. The Associated Press reported that dozens of students who were believed to have come into contact with Austin Phillips, a 19-year-old freshman, had been given antibiotics, and that none of them had shown symptoms of the disease.
  • The University of Washington has halted a genetics study after federal regulators raised questions about whether participants were being made fully aware of the risks, according to the Associated Press. The issues were raised in a September 9 letter from the federal Office of Human Research Protections; university officials responded with a letter of their own Friday, the AP reported.
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