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Quick Takes: Judge Rejects SUNY Albany's Student Fee Rules, Barber-Scotia Staff Down to 1 Employee, New USAID Program, Merger Plans Discouraged in Maine, Strike at Le Moyne Student Paper

Quick Takes: Judge Rejects SUNY Albany's Student Fee Rules, Barber-Scotia Staff Down to 1 Employee, New USAID Program, Merger Plans Discouraged in Maine, Strike at Le Moyne Student Paper
November 11, 2005
  • A federal judge ruled this week that the State University of New York's student government unconstitutionally uses referendums as one way of deciding which student groups receive financial support, the Associated Press reported. The judge also ordered the student government to refund part of the fees paid by two students who sued, saying that they were being forced to subsidize liberal groups while their conservative views did not receive support.
  • The president of Barber-Scotia College, a historically black institution struggling to regain accreditation, has quit, and the board has removed all but one worker from payroll, The Charlotte Observer reported. The college will not have any students for the winter term, but board members told The Observer they were pushing to raise money to regain accreditation.
  • The U.S. Agency for International Development and six higher education associations have announced a $50 million program to promote the involvement of American colleges with global development. The effort, to be known as Higher Education for Development, will sponsor a number of grant programs.
  • A state panel has recommended against merging the University of Maine at Augusta and the University of Southern Maine, the Associated Press reported. The merger had been proposed by some university officials as a way to promote efficiency, but the panel's rejection of the idea was greeted enthusiastically in Augusta, where educators never liked the idea.
  • The staff of The Dolphin, Le Moyne College's student newspaper, is on strike to protest the college's plan to remove the paper's adviser, The Syracuse Post-Standard reported. College officials told The Post-Standard that they wanted standards at the paper to be more professional, but the adviser said that students learn from mistakes, and should be permitted control over the publication.
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