Quick Takes: Student Alcohol Deaths, 'Nature' Offers Open Access Archiving, New Support for Journalism Reforms, Corruption in Russia, Turkey Denies Pressure on SUNY Professor, Ex-Coach's Questionable Claims

  • An Associated Press analysis of federal records has found 157 cases from 1999 through 2005 in which traditional college-age people, aged 18-23, drank themselves to death.
  • July 8, 2008
     
  • An Associated Press analysis of federal records has found 157 cases from 1999 through 2005 in which traditional college-age people, aged 18-23, drank themselves to death. In many of the cases, the AP found, students were known by friends to be drunk, but were encouraged to "sleep it off."
  • The Nature Publishing Group, which produces the journal Nature and other publications, announced that it will offer a free service to deposit authors' pieces in PubMed Central and its British equivalent to comply with new requirements and many scientists' desire to have their work available free and online through open access archives.
  • The Carnegie Corporation of New York and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation on Monday announced an $11 million expansion of their joint program to reform journalism education by supporting new programs at selected institutions. The additional funds will continue fellowships and curricular efforts at the eight journalism schools in the program and add three more: those at Arizona State University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the University of Nebraska at Lincoln.
  • Independent analysts have found higher education in Russia to be a part of society experiencing particularly rapid rates of growth in corruption, with bribes common to secure spots in classes or good grades, The St. Petersburg Times reported. Senior faculty members generally do not take bribes directly, but do so through intermediaries, the report said.
  • Turkey's embassy to the United States has posted a formal response to allegations that its ambassador pressured Donald Quataert, a professor at the State University of New York at Binghamton, to step down as chair of the board of the Institute of Turkish Studies, which was created by Turkey's government to support scholars in the United States. Quataert says that he was told that the funds for the institute were at risk if he remained as chair because he had used the word "genocide" to describe what happened to Armenians during World War I. While there is a wide historical consensus that Armenians did suffer a genocide, Turkey denies this. The embassy originally did not respond to inquiries about Quataert's allegations, but now has released a statement denying that any threats were made and saying that Turkey regretted the resignation.
  • Chicago State University hired Husain Mahmoud as baseball coach last year on an impressive record -- 30th round draft pick for the Cincinnati Reds, a punting record in college football and more. The Chicago Sun-Times reported that many of those claims appear to be false -- or that there is no evidence to back them up. Mahmoud, who was recently fired, told the paper that "I may not have been exactly correct on some of the leagues and different things like that because it's been so long ago.''
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