Higher Education Quick Takes

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Monday, April 11, 2011 - 3:00am

A long article in The Washington Post examines the ties between The Washington Post Company, the newspaper and Kaplan Higher Education. The article notes that while many credit Kaplan with providing the company with a secure financial base at a time of declining journalism-based revenue, the relationships have not always been smooth and have led to uncomfortable scrutiny. "Post Co. executives blame outside forces, including a drop in political support for private-sector education companies and 'financial and corporate agendas,'" the article says. "They also acknowledge missteps. Current and past officers say The Post Co. did not keep close-enough tabs on its fast-sprawling education unit, even as it focused heavily on customers who were poorer and thus at the riskier end of the business. But they say serving that disadvantaged population is important."

Monday, April 11, 2011 - 3:00am

Disgraced financier Bernard Madoff recently gave a jailhouse interview to The Financial Times in which he said that one of his activities behind bars may soon be advising business schools. The article says: "Several business schools have approached him, he adds, and asked him to work on ethics courses. He likes that idea; Harvard and Northwestern are in his sights." The feelings may not be mutual. A spokeswoman for Northwestern's business school said that the institution is not engaged in any discussions with Madoff. (UPDATE: A spokesman for Harvard's business school said Monday morning that there was "no truth" to the idea that it was having any talks with Madoff.)

Friday, April 8, 2011 - 3:00am

The Florida A&M University board voted Thursday for cuts of more than 200 jobs (many of them paid for to date with federal stimulus funds) and the consolidation of many academic programs, and the elimination of others, WCTV News reported. Students have been organizing rallies against the cuts, which the university says are painful but necessary. "We're going to need more than English to make it out there because we're not just competing with English-speaking people for jobs anymore," said Ciara Taylor, a student in a Spanish program that is being cut.

Friday, April 8, 2011 - 3:00am

Arizona lawmakers gave final approval Thursday to legislation that would allow concealed and openly carried guns in public spaces on the state's public college campuses, The Arizona Republic reported. To try to assure passage, the bill's backers had narrowed its scope in recent days; the measure originally would have allowed weapons anywhere on the campuses, including in classrooms. Governor Jan Brewer is expected to sign the legislation, which is one of several such measures moving through states in recent months.

Friday, April 8, 2011 - 3:00am

A professor at Folsom Lake College last week offered to raise students' grades if they helped the college's fund-raising efforts, but the offer was withdrawn after faculty members and students voiced concerns, The Sacramento Bee reported. Bernard Gibson, the professor, did not return calls from reporters.

Friday, April 8, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, the University of Texas at Austin's Mark Simmons outlines the benefits of green roof technology. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Thursday, April 7, 2011 - 3:00am

The University of California at San Diego and the California Western School of Law have placed a "pause" on talks about merging the private law school into the university. Officials cited the budget crisis currently facing the University of California.

Thursday, April 7, 2011 - 3:00am

A deadly shooting stunned Southern Union State Community College, in Alabama, on Wednesday. The Opelika-Auburn News reported that Thomas F. May III returned to the campus at 6:45 p.m. and told reporters he was the man authorities were seeking. At around 4 p.m., a man opened fire on a minivan, killing one and injuring three others.

Thursday, April 7, 2011 - 3:00am

In today's Academic Minute, David Langston of the Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts explores how the assumption of progress underlies the concept of Modernity. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Thursday, April 7, 2011 - 3:00am

Legislators in Maryland gave final approval Wednesday to legislation that would ramp up regulation of for-profit colleges that operate in the state, phasing out financial aid to their students and imposing other restrictions, The Washington Examiner reported. Gov. Martin O'Malley is expected to sign the legislation, Senate Bill 695.

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