Higher Education Quick Takes

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Wednesday, October 13, 2010 - 3:00am

The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday let stand lower court rulings concluding that the University of California did not violate private Christian high schools' freedom of speech and religion by not certifying certain courses for its college preparatory requirements, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. The Supreme Court declined to hear the case, without comment, as is its custom.

Wednesday, October 13, 2010 - 3:00am

The revamped federal tax credit for higher education expenses has nearly doubled the amount of money flowing to American taxpayers, the Obama administration said in a report released today. The report was issued as President Obama plans a speech today urging Congress to make permanent the expanded tax credit, known as the American Opportunity Tax Credit, which was enacted last year as part of the economic recovery legislation. According to the report, which was prepared by the Treasury Department, 12.5 million students and their families benefited from the tax credit in 2009, about 50 percent more than took advantage of the two tax benefits that the expanded tax credit replaced. The average recipients earned a credit of more than $1,700, up about 75 percent over the average Hope Credit or Lifetime Learning Credit recipient in 2008. About 4.5 million recipients earned the new credit because it is refundable, which neither the Hope Tax Credit nor the Lifelong Learning tax deduction were.

Wednesday, October 13, 2010 - 3:00am

  • 2010 ABET Annual Conference, ABET, Inc., Oct. 28-29, Baltimore, Md.
  • 52nd Annual Meeting: At the Confluence of Collaboration and Creation, National Council of University Research Administrators, Oct. 31-Nov. 3, Washington.
  • 2010 Assembly: Defining Quality in Higher Education, American Association of University Administrators, Nov. 3-6, Washington.
  • AMS Annual Meeting, American Musicological Society, Nov. 4-7, Indianapolis.
  • Chief Academic Officers Institute, Council of Independent Colleges, Nov. 6-9, Williamsburg, Va.
  • Strategic Enrollment Management Conference: The Origin and Future of SEM, American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers, Nov. 7-10, Nashville.
  • 22nd Annual Conference, WCET, Nov. 10-13, La Jolla, Calif.
  • Wednesday, October 13, 2010 - 3:00am

    A longtime sports agent tells Sports Illustrated this week that he made payments to several dozen football players while they were in college, in violation of National Collegiate Athletic Association rules. The "as told to" tale from Josh Luchs recounts his payments to numerous well-known and not-so-famous athletes (many of which Sports Illustrated was able to confirm), and it comes at a time when the issue of sports agents is quickly rising on the college sports agenda, amid recent controversies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the University of Southern California, and other highly visible sports programs.

    Wednesday, October 13, 2010 - 3:00am

    The repositories that house overflow books from the libraries at Ohio's 13 public universities are culling their print reference collections because they are running out of space, the Columbus Dispatch reported. The five repositories are working together to donate or recycle all but two print copies of reference materials statewide -- one that can be checked out and another that can be kept permanently in one of the repository, the newspaper said. Officials hope the "de-duplication" process will clear out space for other overflow books, since the state does not have money to build new repositories.

    Tuesday, October 12, 2010 - 3:00am

    Iran top leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, is moving against Islamic Azad University, the country's largest private university and a center of moderate thought, the Associated Press reported. The ayatollah issued a decree Monday declaring that the university's endowment was created illegally and thus has not validity. The endowment has been key to the university's independence from the government.

    Tuesday, October 12, 2010 - 3:00am

    A new study by University of Washington researchers has found that undergraduates in study abroad programs double their alcohol consumption -- from an average of four drinks per week to about eight. The researchers note that, beyond issues associated with increased alcohol intake anywhere, excessive drinking abroad can place students in greater danger since they don't know local laws or customs, and can perpetuate negative stereotypes of Americans. The research is being published in the journal Psychology of Addictive Behaviors.

    Tuesday, October 12, 2010 - 3:00am

    Several universities -- in the wake of the suicide of Tyler Clementi, a Rutgers student -- are announcing new efforts to combat and prevent anti-gay bullying. The University of Wisconsin at Madison has started a campaign called "Stop the Silence" to support gay students, and the dean of students is convening a series of discussions on harassment and bullying. Chancellor Biddy Martin issued a statement in which she said: "The suicide rates for gay and lesbian youth are appallingly high. Hatred, harassment and bullying have serious consequences. Let us re-commit to a safe, respectful and welcoming community for everyone."

    At Grand Valley State University, President Thomas Haas sent an e-mail to all students and faculty members Friday in which he said that "any time you or anyone in the Grand Valley State University community feels belittled, disrespected, threatened, or unsafe because of who you are, the entire university community is diminished," The Grand Rapids Press reported.

    Tuesday, October 12, 2010 - 3:00am

  • Geri Hockfield Malandra, founder and principal of Malandra Consulting LLC and former vice chancellor for strategic management at the University of Texas System, has been named provost at Kaplan University.
  • Scott Richland, president of Lunada Bay Investors, LLC, has been selected as chief investment officer at California Institute of Technology.
  • Jessica M. Rocheleau, visiting assistant professor at Misericordia University, in Pennsylvania, has been appointed as assistant professor of biology at Western New England College, in Massachusetts.
  • David Rosselli, associate athletic director for development-external relations at the University of California at Berkeley, has been chosen as assistant dean of development in the Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry at the University of the Pacific, also in California.
  • David E. Thomas, director of student and school support services at Victory Schools Inc., has been named dean of the division of adult and community education at Community College of Philadelphia.
  • Doug White, adjunct professor in the George H. Heyman Jr. Center for Philanthropy and Fundraising at the School of Continuing and Professional Studies at New York University, has been promoted to academic director of the center.
  • The appointments above are drawn from The Lists on Inside Higher Ed, which also includes a comprehensive catalog of upcoming events in higher education. To submit job changes or calendar items, please click here.

    Tuesday, October 12, 2010 - 3:00am

    The spreading controversy surrounding agents in big-time college sports claimed several more athletes Monday, as the National Collegiate Athletic Association permanently barred two University of North Carolina football players and the university itself dismissed a third from the team. The three players had all been found by a joint NCAA-UNC investigation not only to have taken improper benefits from sports agents (including jewelry and trips to the Bahamas and elsewhere) but also to have lied to investigators.

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