Higher Education Quick Takes

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Thursday, July 15, 2010 - 3:00am

A group called Jewish Voice for Peace -- which is highly critical of Israel's government -- is organizing petitions and hoping to force votes by TIAA-CREF to divest from holdings in companies that the group says "profit from the Israeli occupation of the Gaza Strip and the West Bank, including East Jerusalem." The group notes past TIAA-CREF policies on investments in companies linked to the Sudan and says that Israel should be the next country sanctioned in this way. TIAA-CREF is opposing the divestment idea. "While TIAA-CREF acknowledges participants’ varying views on Israeli and Palestinian policies and the Gaza Strip and West Bank, we are unable to alter our investment policy in accordance with those views. Our responsibility to earn a competitive financial return on the retirement savings entrusted to us by 3.7 million participants obliges us to invest in a diverse line-up of companies across all sectors of the global economy," said a statement from the pension giant. As to the Sudan comparison, TIAA-CREF noted that its policies there have been consistent with those of the U.S. government, which does not endorse a boycott of Israel. "We believe that concerns about the situation in the Gaza Strip and the West Bank are best addressed by U.S. foreign policy and lend themselves less to using one’s shareholder status to influence portfolio companies," said the statement.

Thursday, July 15, 2010 - 3:00am

The National Collegiate Athletic Association has put Ball State University on three years' probation for rules violations in its women’s tennis program. The NCAA report, released Wednesday, notes that Kathy Bull, former coach, required her players “to participate in playing and practice hours that exceeded time limitations," “failed to provide two calendar days off per week” and “required student-athletes to participate in mandatory athletic activities during the summer vacation period.” In addition to the probation, the women’s tennis team at Ball State will have its allowable playing and practice time limited further this coming season. Bull received a three-year show-cause order, which “outlines how athletic duties must be limited” if she takes another coaching job.

Thursday, July 15, 2010 - 3:00am

Birmingham-Southern College has announced deep cuts and layoffs, following the discovery of errors in the way the college was awarding financial aid that have resulted in the need to cut spending by about $10 million a year, The Birmingham News reported. The cuts include 51 layoffs, pay cuts that average 10 percent for all employees (but that are larger for those who are more highly compensated), two one-week furloughs for non-faculty employees, and suspension of contributions to retirement funds.

Thursday, July 15, 2010 - 3:00am

Betty White is becoming a community college professor -- of the fictional variety. The Los Angeles Times reported that she will guest star on the NBC show "Community," playing June Bauer, " an esteemed but slightly unhinged anthropology professor." The show was originally the cause of much concern among community college educators, but many have come around.

Thursday, July 15, 2010 - 3:00am

The University of Michigan's medical school recently toughened its conflict of interest rules by barring pharmaceutical industry funding to support continuing medical education. That leaves some wondering why the university's president, Mary Sue Coleman, sits on the board of Johnson & Johnson, The Detroit Free Press reported. Coleman sees the situations as different, noting that she is not involved with the kinds of decisions at the medical school that could directly involve Johnson & Johnson's products. "It's essential that U-M have a voice and interact with the business world," a university spokesman told the Free Press. "She thinks it's her duty to understand what the commercial world is doing."

Wednesday, July 14, 2010 - 3:00am

Wesley College, a small Mississippi institution, is closing, The Jackson Clarion-Ledger reported. The college has about 140 students most semesters, and has been struggling with debt from a new dormitory and drops in donations.

Wednesday, July 14, 2010 - 3:00am

The University of Toronto is closing its Center for Comparative Literature as part of a plan to save money and consolidate certain areas in the humanities, The Globe and Mail reported. While the university says that the changes reflect the way comparative literature has entered the academy broadly, negating the need for a free-standing center, many scholars disagree and argue that a key program is being lost.

Wednesday, July 14, 2010 - 3:00am

When they're criticized for doing too little to measure how much and how well their students learn, colleges often complain that they don't get enough credit for the assessment activity in which they engage. A new report suggests that the institutions themselves are partially responsible for that gap. "Exploring the Landscape: What Institutional Websites Reveal About Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Activities," released by the National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment, compared what campus provosts said their institutions were doing on assessment with the information about assessment that was available on the colleges' Web sites. “To the extent an institution’s website is a window into its performance, this study shows that schools need to do more to inform the public about what they are doing with regard to assessing student learning outcomes,” said George Kuh, the Indiana University professor who heads NILOA.

Wednesday, July 14, 2010 - 3:00am

Twenty-seven colleges and universities have filed a brief with a federal appeals court backing the University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa in its dispute with a sports artist that the university says did not have the right to paint and sell images of Crimson Tide football games, The Tuscaloosa News reported. The universities include all Southeastern Conference members except Mississippi State University. Prominent backers from other conferences include the University of Notre Dame, University of Texas at Austin and the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

Wednesday, July 14, 2010 - 3:00am

  • 29th Annual Conference: Fitting STEM into the College Opportunity Equation, Council for Opportunity in Education, Sept. 1-4, San Diego.
  • 2010 Annual Meeting and Exhibition, American Political Science Association, Sept. 2-5, Washington.
  • The Toolbox Project Conference 2010: Enhancing Communication in Cross-Disciplinary Research, Sept. 30-Oct. 2, Coeur D'Alene.
  • 56th Annual Program Meeting: Promoting Sustainability in Social Work, Council on Social Work Education, Oct. 14-17, Portland, Ore.
  • 2010 NSEA Annual Conference, National Student Employment Association, Oct. 18-21, Cincinnati.
  • ACUTA Fall Seminar, Association for Information Communications Technology Professionals in Higher Education, Oct. 24-27, Vienna, Va.
  • Facing the Divides: Diversity, Learning, and Pathways to Inclusive Excellence, Association of American Colleges and Universities, Oct. 21-23, Houston.
  • These meetings, conferences, seminars and other events will be held in the coming weeks in and around higher education. They are among the many such that appear in our calendar on The Lists on Inside Higher Ed, which also includes a comprehensive catalog of job changes in higher education. This listing will appear as a regular feature in this space.

    To submit a listing, click here.

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