Higher Education Quick Takes

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Thursday, August 27, 2009 - 3:00am

California must adopt a more standardized statewide system of student transfer if it is to produce enough college graduates to fill its work force, says a new report, which points to structures in other states as models. The report, which was published by the Institute for Higher Education Leadership & Policy at California State University at Sacramento and reported on by the Los Angeles Times, contains a series of recommendations, based on an examination of policies in Arizona, Florida, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Texas and Washington, designed to ease the transfer of students from the state's decentralized community college system to public four-year institutions in California.

Thursday, August 27, 2009 - 3:00am

The University of Wisconsin at Madison has ended sponsorship agreements with two major brewing companies after a campus panel recommended that banning beer ads from football broadcasts would help the fight against binge drinking, the Associated Press reported. The deals with MillerCoors and Anheuser-Busch InBev had brought the university $425,000 a year, and Badger sports officials had vigorously argued for sustaining the agreements (and the revenues). But Wisconsin's new chancellor, Biddy Martin, backed the recommendation of a committee seeking ways to reduce campus drinking. "It hurts the athletic department financially but they are stepping up and taking one for the team," Vince Sweeney, Madison's vice chancellor for university relations, told the A.P. "This was an approach that people felt would have a positive impact."

Thursday, August 27, 2009 - 3:00am

Gov. Pat Quinn of Illinois reversed course on Wednesday, allowing two University of Illinois trustees to stay on its board even though he had vowed to fire any board members who did not resign in the wake of an admissions scandal at the university, the Chicago Tribune reported. All but two trustees had resigned since Quinn and others called for their resignations in the scandal involving political patronage in admissions, which stemmed from reporting by the Tribune, but two board members had threatened to sue the state if they were forced from their jobs. In a speech Wednesday, Quinn said he thought the two trustees should go but said he didn't want to open the state to legal vulnerability. The newspaper reported that other trustees who had quit in response to Quinn's vow, from which he has now backed down, were now wondering if they had made the right decision.

Thursday, August 27, 2009 - 3:00am

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs exercised the nuclear option in its continuing dispute with the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, opting out of its five-year, $75 million contract for Gulf War syndrome research after just two years. The V.A. cited "persistent noncompliance and numerous performance deficiencies" as reasons for canceling its agreement, several weeks after it issued a highly critical audit focused on one leading researcher at the U.T. center. Despite the audit's findings, the university issued a response expressing surprise at the agency's action and saying it "strongly" disagreed with its conclusions.

Thursday, August 27, 2009 - 3:00am

As threatened, Paul Quinn College sued the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools late Tuesday, the Dallas Morning News reported. The move came after the regional accrediting association's Commission on Colleges denied the Dallas college's appeal of its decision in June not to renew Paul Quinn's accreditation. Paul Quinn's lawsuit alleges that the accreditor violated its due process rights.

Thursday, August 27, 2009 - 3:00am

Brigham Young University at Hawaii has been penalized by the Division II Committee on Infractions for violating four sets of National Collegiate Athletic Association rules. The committee report, released Wednesday, notes that the institution allowed eight transfer athletes to compete before they were academically eligible. Division II rules mandate that transfer athletes have completed at least six credit hours in the semester before entering a new institution. Secondly, on four separate occasions, the institution violated a NCAA rule that requires all athletes to have selected an academic concentration before their third year. Thirdly, the university allowed its head tennis coach to oversee the completion of amateurism and eligibility forms for international athletes -- a clear conflict of interest as the NCAA considers this a responsibility of the compliance officer. Finally, the university let three athletes practice, play and travel with their respective teams before they were cleared by the NCAA Eligibility Center. The committee has placed the institution on three years of probation for "failing to monitor" its athletics program.

Wednesday, August 26, 2009 - 3:00am

Sen. Edward M. Kennedy died late Tuesday night. In his role as Senate chairman of the committee with oversight of many key education and research programs, he was influential in the creation of many them and in the (largely successful) fights to block elimination of them when some sought to do so. Kennedy pushed to add funds for low-income students in a variety of measures. He was also active in efforts to defend affirmative action, to create Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, to encourage national service, and to add funds for biomedical research. A number of the senator's former aides on education issues hold key jobs in the Obama administration and higher education associations. A detailed list of the legislation he helped shape during his Senate career may be found here.

Wednesday, August 26, 2009 - 3:00am

Louisiana has a committee that is studying the future of higher education in the state. But as that panel is just beginning its work, another state commission is weighing in, reviving the long-debated idea of having all public colleges in the state overseen by one governing board, The Advocate of Baton Rouge reported. The recommendation came Monday from a group advising the state's Commission on Streamlining Government, which is studying ways to make the state's operations more cost effective and efficient given a certain decline in state revenues through 2012. The panel was generally supposed to focus on areas other than higher education, given the work being done at the same time by the Postsecondary Education Review Committee established by Gov. Bobby Jindal. But that didn't stop members of the streamlining panel's advisory group on efficiency and benchmarking, including former Gov. Buddy Roemer, to propose that all colleges in the state report to the Louisiana Board of Regents, which now coordinates the work of public colleges but does not govern them. Louisiana's colleges are governed by Louisiana State University Board of Supervisors, the Southern University Board of Supervisors, the Board of Supervisors for the University of Louisiana System, and the Louisiana Community and Technical College Board.

Wednesday, August 26, 2009 - 3:00am

The National Association of College Stores and the Internal Revenue Service have teamed up on a new Web site designed to help make students aware that they can now recoup some of what they spend on textbooks and other course materials thanks to an expanded tax credit enacted by Congress as part of economic recovery legislation in February. The site, textbookaid.org, provides information about how college students can take advantage of the American Opportunity Tax Credit, which temporarily expands the Hope college tax credit in multiple ways, including by including textbooks and other course materials as reimbursable expenses for the first time.

Wednesday, August 26, 2009 - 3:00am

  • Charles Austin, consultant and former city manager of Columbia, S.C., has been named dean of the School of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences at Benedict College.
  • Linda Finch, associate professor of nursing in the Loewenberg School of Nursing at the University of Memphis, has been named associate dean and director of undergraduate programs at the Loewenberg School of Nursing there.
  • Joyce Minor, visiting distinguished professor of economics at Macalester College, in Minnesota, has been named the Karl Egge Professor in Economics there.
  • Samir Raychoudhury, professor of biology and director of research and development at Benedict College, has been promoted to dean of the School of Science, Technology and Engineering there.
  • William Waite, interim vice president for academic affairs and dean of liberal arts at Sussex County Community College, in New Jersey, has been selected as senior division dean there.
  • Fred Wangwe, assistant parish priest for St. Joseph's Parish, Mechanicsburg, Pa., has been chosen as Catholic chaplain at Bucknell University.
  • Cat Warren, associate professor at North Carolina State University, has been appointed as editor of Academe, the magazine of the American Association of University Professors.
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    The appointments above are drawn from The Lists on Inside Higher Ed, which also includes a comprehensive catalog of upcoming events in higher education. To submit job changes or calendar items, please click here.

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