Assessment

Holding Presidents Accountable for Learning

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Regents of Georgia university system individually asked 35 campus leaders how they planned to improve retention and graduation rates. The meetings were occasionally uncomfortable; the answers sometimes unsatisfactory.

Completion Targets for Cities

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Gates Foundation unveils new plans by four municipalities to push for better graduation rates.

The Graduation Limitation

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Association's report documents flaws in sources of data on college degree completion -- without proposing any solutions, critics say.

Veterans, Less Engaged but Satisfied

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Influential student survey now details impressions and habits of returning servicemembers, as well as more information about individual majors.

'Collective Action' on Assessing Learning

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A new alliance of college presidents was born today, aiming both to show the world that colleges are working to measure and improve student learning and to put pressure on themselves to intensify that work.

Encouraging Deep Learning

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Annual survey of community college students reveals that many do not engage in critical thinking often enough to generate classroom success.

New Data, No Better Results

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First available information from more-recent cohort of entering college students finds graduation rates stagnant, even receding.

How Doctoral Graduates Fare

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Deans talk about the importance of tracking job placement -- and admit many of their institutions don't do much in that regard.

'Academically Adrift'

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If the purpose of a college education is for students to learn, academe is failing, according to Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses, a book being released today by University of Chicago Press.

So, Students Don't Learn -- Now What?

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WASHINGTON -- In the company of higher education experts and policymakers, the authors of a damning new book about higher education asserting that many college students graduate without actually learning anything acknowledged Tuesday that the tool used to reach that conclusion isn't perfect. But they all agreed that it doesn't make the findings any less "sobering."

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