Publishing

Survival -- Through Open Access

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Utah State University Press, which faced threat of elimination, will continue to operate as a scholarly publisher, but with a new model.

A Call for Copyright Rebellion

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Lawrence Lessig asks why academe accepts rules that limit the spread of scholarship.

Open Access Encyclopedias

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In the age of Google and Wikipedia, can higher education create online reference works that are free, scholarly, and economically viable?

A College Press Run By Undergrads

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A Vermont college creates a publishing enterprise for students, by students.

Academic and Publishing Freedom

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Article criticizing Wheaton College, seen by many as flagship of evangelical higher ed, is killed by key publication in Christian intellectual life. Why?

'Orphan' Tug of War

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Another deadline has passed for filing commentary on the pending settlement between Google and major associations of American authors and publishers over Google Book Search, the controversial project that aims to scan millions of books into a searchable electronic database.

Frustration Over 'Framing'

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Purdue University’s Online Writing Lab, also know as OWL, helps students improve their writing skills. But the writing lab's instructors want students who use OWL’s Web resources to do so on the program's Web site.

That’s why officials at OWL were disturbed to find last week that Tutor.com, a company that offers free instructional resources in addition to commercial e-tutoring services, was “framing” OWL’s original writing under its own banner.

Keeping It Simple

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The Tomorrow's Professor e-newsletter, which has thrived despite eschewing the trappings of modern media, prepares to put out its 1,000th edition.

Highlighting E-Readers

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Colleges release analyses of major experiments with Kindles -- and find students use less paper with the devices, but want better note-taking ability.

A Win For Publishers

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U.S. academic publishing giants hope a favorable ruling by a German court will put a dent in the black market for pirated e-books.

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