International higher education

The 'Community College' Internationally

Smart Title: 

Jorge Perez, a professor of mathematics, first encountered a community college when he came to the United States from Chile in 1980. "To me, my first impression of the community college was kind of disappointing because of the level of mathematics that was taught, but once I started seeing the kinds of students that we were serving, I really bought into the idea of a community college. I realized that a community college is an engine for social mobility,” said Perez, who teaches at LaGuardia Community College, of the City University of New York.

Universities at a Crossroads

Section: 
Smart Title: 

WASHINGTON – Given the influence of rapid globalization and the emergence of knowledge-based societies, the universities of the future will bear virtually no resemblance to those of today. Or so argued a group of American and Asian education leaders who gathered here Monday to speculate on how the sector may evolve to meet future challenges.

'Financing Higher Education Worldwide'

Smart Title: 

Who pays for higher education? Whether talking about the government role or the student responsibility, the question is controversial all over the world, and many policies are in flux. Financing Higher Education Worldwide, a new book from the Johns Hopkins University Press, surveys the globe for the trends and their implications. The authors are D.

All Eyes on India

Section: 
Smart Title: 

For U.S. universities, India remains a frontier of sorts. “Right now, we’re basically doing exploration of India, trying to figure out what the path forward is there,” said the president of Georgia State University, Mark P. Becker, who traveled to India this spring. Georgia State isn’t interested in opening a branch campus in India – one, because it doesn’t have the resources and two, because, Becker said, “it’s not exactly clear why we would want to do that at this point.” But the university – like many others in the U.S.

International Bonding

Section: 
Smart Title: 

WASHINGTON -- Sudirman, a graduate of the Muhammadiyah teaching college in Surakarta, Indonesia, did not need an American education to wind up memorialized in a six-foot portrait on the wall of the Indonesian embassy. But then again, driving out Dutch colonialists is not as big an industry today as it was in the 1940s.

Study Finds Foreign Enrollments Slowing

Section: 
Smart Title: 

The enrollment of foreign students in undergraduate and graduate programs in the United States has suffered as a result of the worldwide economic crisis -- but perhaps not as much as many have feared, a report from the National Science Foundation suggests.

Academic Outcomes of Study Abroad

Section: 
Smart Title: 

In 2000, researchers began an ambitious effort to document the academic outcomes of study abroad across the 35-institution University System of Georgia. Ten years later, they’ve found that students who study abroad have improved academic performance upon returning to their home campus, higher graduation rates, and improved knowledge of cultural practices and context compared to students in control groups. They’ve also found that studying abroad helps, rather than hinders, academic performance of at-risk students.

Searching for Cash Overseas

Section: 
Smart Title: 

NEW YORK -- What do you do, asked a fund raiser in the audience, when a prospective donor from Asia asks how much he has to give to get an honorary degree?

From a scan of the room here at the Council for Advancement and Support of Education, it appeared that some were horrified that the question was asked and others were unfazed. (Not coincidentally, the audience was a mix of those who already have ambitious fund raising goals abroad and those hoping to start them.)

Policing Plagiarism Abroad

Section: 
Smart Title: 

It’s not uncommon for colleges to discontinue academic programs overseas for financial reasons. But Centenary College, in New Jersey, is shutting down an M.B.A. program in Asia to contain a plagiarism epidemic. About 400 students are currently enrolled in the program at locations in Beijing, Shanghai and Taiwan.

Privatized Pathways for Foreign Students

Smart Title: 

U.S. colleges have increasingly turned to for-profit companies for help in recruiting international students. Now, with the growing popularity of “pathway” programs -- which feature a hybrid of credit-bearing coursework and instruction in English language and academic skills -- some institutions are also outsourcing the responsibility for teaching and supporting international students their first year on campus.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - International higher education
Back to Top