Court rulings

Key Legal Win in Adjunct Union Battle

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Federal appeals court rejects Pace University's attempt to exclude new instructors from bargaining unit.

An Expensive Expulsion

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When U. of the Cumberlands expelled a gay student, it set off a chain of events that may lead to its losing a $10 million appropriation.

Ohio Court Unravels Professor's Victory in Age Discrimination Case

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It is probably cold comfort to Robert Lipset that the three judges of the Ohio Court of Appeals who heard his age discrimination case against Ohio University acknowledged in their ruling that the university may have paid too little heed to his teaching excellence, saying that "we, if sitting as Lipset's promotion and tenure committee, may have valued educational considerations over financial and research considerations.

Not So Free Speech in Campus Governance

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Faculty groups fear federal court decision endangers the right of professors at public institutions to speak out on matters of campus policy.

Court Upholds U. of California Admissions Requirements

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Federal judge rejects Christian group's challenge to university's system of assessing which high-school courses are suitable as preparatory credits.

Judicial Review Under Review

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Case involving a suspended U. of Florida fraternity spurs questions about what opportunity student groups should have to respond to charges against them.

Gay Rights vs. Religious Rights

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Federal judge, in first decision of its kind, finds that materials in "Safe Space" at Georgia Tech unconstitutionally evaluated different faiths.

Michigan Ruling Bars Domestic Partner Benefits

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Impact of decision by state's highest court is unclear on latest approach by universities to providing health insurance to gay couples and others.

Legal Win for Indiana Faculty Who Aren't Renewed

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If a university declined to renew a non-tenure-track professor's fixed-term teaching contract, is the professor then voluntarily unemployed? According to the Indiana Supreme Court last week, the answer is no, a decision that would make the former employee eligible for unemployment benefits -- just as if he had been terminated through no fault of his own.

Mixed Ruling in Tulane Lawsuit on 'Donor Intent'

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Louisiana law gives donors and their heirs the right to sue to colleges and other nonprofit groups that fail to carry out terms of their gifts, the state's Supreme Court ruled Tuesday.

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