Court rulings

U.S. Court Rejects 'Pervasively Sectarian' Test

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In a major victory for religious colleges, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday that Colorado may not distinguish between sectarian and "pervasively sectarian" colleges to deny state funds to students in the latter category. Such distinctions, the court ruled, amount to illegal state preferences for some religious groups over others.

Court Strikes Down 'Overbroad' Harassment Policy

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A federal appeals court on Monday declared Temple University's now-abandoned sexual harassment policy unconstitutional -- and it did so in a way that legal experts agree could make it much more difficult for colleges and universities to defend nondiscrimination policies that limit the speech of students.

Clarence Thomas, Champion of Black Colleges

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Supreme Court justice urges educators to respect their mission -- and also reflects on his early days, desegregation and affirmative action.

In California, Uncertainty on Immigrant Student Tuition

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Appeals court finds that in extending lower resident tuition rates to undocumented students, state "thwarts" Congress's intent.

One for the Little Guy

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Federal appeals court sides with student loan borrower in bankruptcy fight with the country's biggest loan guarantee agency.

From Plaintiff to Donor

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Anthropologist who brought landmark sexual discrimination suit against Brown U. in the late '70s gives $1 million to the institution she once fought.

The Newest Trademark? College Colors

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Apparel company's t-shirts that mimicked college teams' colors violated federal law, U.S. appeals court rules.

Professor Wins Chance to Clear Name

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Appeals court says Ohio U. officials must defend decision to strip graduate rank from an engineering faculty member and give him a public hearing; case emerged from plagiarism controversy.

Supreme Court Keeps Title IX Plaintiffs' Options Open

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In recent years, some federal courts -- at the urging of lawyers for educational institutions and administrators charged with sex discrimination and other alleged wrongdoing, and to the dismay of advocates for women's rights -- have embraced the notion that students or employees who sue under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 should not also have the ability to sue under the 14th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.

EEOC Can Sue Public University, Court Rules

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Federal appeals panel says 11th amendment immunity protects state institution from direct age bias suit by former employee -- but not from claim by U.S. agency on worker's behalf.

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