Anamaria Dutceac Segesten

Always the political scientist, Anamaria Dutceac Segesten is interested in power relations both in the social & political life and in the academia. She is currently a research fellow at the Center for Modern European Studies, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, and has worked previously at Lund University and Malmö University, both in Sweden. With experience from American and European higher education, her favorite topics at the University of Venus are the challenges of being a GenX woman in the academia, the future of the university, and the use of technology and social media in teaching social sciences and the humanities.

Anamaria likes to be creative in more than one way. For a year ago she was part of a team that started two new programs in European Studies at Lund University. Before that she created her own intensive summer course, and, of course designed several other courses related to EU politics and to the Balkan region. Other creative outlets are photography and knitting.

Anamaria loves languages: she is fluent in four and knowledgeable in four others. She likes to use them all while commenting on Twitter. You can find her blogging on education issues here and on her research project on eurosymbols here.

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Most Recent Articles

March 9, 2014
Joining forces.
October 3, 2013
A visit to the school museum.
September 8, 2013
What is OK to share?
July 7, 2013
Strategies for the classroom.
May 7, 2013
 A worthy initiative in the name of academic freedom.
April 11, 2013
There was a time when university presses, defined not as enterprises but as simple printing facilities, had as primary function the publication/diffusion of research texts produced at the university with which they were affiliated. One of the primary text forms to be published was the doctoral or magisterial dissertation.
March 14, 2013
I was recently at the cinema and watched a new production based on the biography of political theorist Hannah Arendt. The film portrays Arendt primarily as the author of the controversial book Eichmann in Jerusalem, a book that provoked a wide debate about the nature of evil, responsibility, and nationalism, and nearly cost her her university position. In the culminating scene of the film, Arendt holds an open lecture in the university auditorium in front of a large audience of students, colleagues and (former) friends. In it, she is portrayed as an astute speaker, a convinced and convincing teacher, passionate, articulate and inspiring.
February 10, 2013
In comparison with business and political leaders, leaders in academia appear different (and I use mostly the Swedish/European case as example for my ideas). At least in Swedish universities, academic leadership is collegial and limited in time.
December 16, 2012
I recently read for the first time a book that for many (most?) is a classic: Academic Tribes and Territories: Intellectual Enquiry and the Culture of Disciplines, in its revised edition (2001). I admit that the idea of an ethnography of academic disciplines and their internal codes is a bit narcissistic in the sense that it belongs to the genre of academics studying and writing about academia, but then so is this blog and all the writing about the theories of pedagogy and the analyses of higher education.
September 30, 2012
The more education the better for each and all. So why are there not enough resources?

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