Anamaria Dutceac Segesten

Always the political scientist, Anamaria Dutceac Segesten is interested in power relations both in the social & political life and in the academia. She is currently a research fellow at the Center for Modern European Studies, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, and has worked previously at Lund University and Malmö University, both in Sweden. With experience from American and European higher education, her favorite topics at the University of Venus are the challenges of being a GenX woman in the academia, the future of the university, and the use of technology and social media in teaching social sciences and the humanities.

Anamaria likes to be creative in more than one way. For a year ago she was part of a team that started two new programs in European Studies at Lund University. Before that she created her own intensive summer course, and, of course designed several other courses related to EU politics and to the Balkan region. Other creative outlets are photography and knitting.

Anamaria loves languages: she is fluent in four and knowledgeable in four others. She likes to use them all while commenting on Twitter. You can find her blogging on education issues here and on her research project on eurosymbols here.

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Most Recent Articles

September 5, 2012
I remember that, as a child, I loved to copy in a notebook the best parts of the literature I was reading.  I would taste the words in my mouth as I was transferring them from the page of the book and jotting them on my little pad, thus enjoying them even more. I must admit that secretly, I wished it were I who authored those pretty phrases, I who had found those brilliant and unexpected pairings between adjectives and nouns. But even if I was just the scribe taking down the notes of the divine inspiration of others, the activity of repeating the path of their pen was pleasurable and, later on, inspirational.
July 24, 2012
Summer is here, and for most of us it is also spelled as v-a-c-a-t-i-o-n: sunny days, ice cream, mint juleps, children at play, and long family evenings. But this is not all there is to it…
June 20, 2012
We have recently learned that many women choose to leave academia after getting their doctoral degree, and women are not the only ones deciding against a career in higher education. Especially in the hard sciences, many researchers prefer to work in their respective industries or in special research institutes. More money, a shorter path between the project stage and the practical implementation, and more effective administration are some of the reasons why this is the case.
May 22, 2012
Not long ago, the Swedish design duo Hjärta Smärta, composed of Samira Bouabana and Angela Tillman Sperandio, initiated a project aimed at recognizing the talent of women designers. They noticed that most of the books in their field showcased the work and the biographies of male creators, and wanted to fill the gap by including all those major female figures in the world of design. They admired their older counterparts’ artistic muse but were looking for also for some inspiration in the biographies of these highly successful but less known female personalities in the world of design.
April 12, 2012
Recently, I had a conversation around the lunch table with several of my colleagues. The discussion turned to the requirement to take pedagogical courses, now part of the criteria for getting an academic job at my university. Were these courses useful or just necessary? Do they teach something relevant for improving one’s teaching? As good scientists, we stopped discussing the courses and focused thereon on the definition of “teaching” or, more specifically, on what “good teaching” should stand for. Of the many things we discussed during that lunch, the idea of the outdated lecture stayed with me, I decided to dedicate this post to a critique of this method of teaching.
March 16, 2012
It is very fashionable these days in the world of arts and entertainment to create prequels. As opposed to sequels, telling readers/viewers what happened next to their favorite characters or plots, prequels go back in time. I find myself following this trend and writing a prequel to my post on how to avoid Ph.D. drop-out.
February 14, 2012
Ph.D. students: How to finish your dissertation and enjoy your time writing it
December 13, 2011
Less than a month ago, I returned from a working visit to Hong Kong. I benefited from a scholarship awarded for teacher mobility at my home institution and could travel to a partner university in Hong Kong where I held a series of lectures at various levels with Europe and the European Union in focus. Now that I am back, I am sharing with you my thoughts about the lessons I took home from this experience. 
October 27, 2011
What is motivation? On one hand we mean motive, or the reason for doing something; on the other we mean the energy and enthusiasm a person invests in the thing that she or he is doing. When teachers are talking about motivating students, it seems to me that the two meanings are conflated.
October 2, 2011
I have been travelling quite a bit in recent months; I attended several conferences and met many new and interesting people. While many of the discussions in the presentation halls have been on the official topics of the conferences; the “unconferences,” the meetings during the coffee breaks and official receptions, have brought up other topics, and more often than not the question of being a women and an academic came up in the discussion.

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