Anamaria Dutceac Segesten

Always the political scientist, Anamaria Dutceac Segesten is interested in power relations both in the social & political life and in the academia. She is currently a research fellow at the Center for Modern European Studies, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, and has worked previously at Lund University and Malmö University, both in Sweden. With experience from American and European higher education, her favorite topics at the University of Venus are the challenges of being a GenX woman in the academia, the future of the university, and the use of technology and social media in teaching social sciences and the humanities.

Anamaria likes to be creative in more than one way. For a year ago she was part of a team that started two new programs in European Studies at Lund University. Before that she created her own intensive summer course, and, of course designed several other courses related to EU politics and to the Balkan region. Other creative outlets are photography and knitting.

Anamaria loves languages: she is fluent in four and knowledgeable in four others. She likes to use them all while commenting on Twitter. You can find her blogging on education issues here and on her research project on eurosymbols here.

To reach this person, click here.

Most Recent Articles

October 2, 2011
I have been travelling quite a bit in recent months; I attended several conferences and met many new and interesting people. While many of the discussions in the presentation halls have been on the official topics of the conferences; the “unconferences,” the meetings during the coffee breaks and official receptions, have brought up other topics, and more often than not the question of being a women and an academic came up in the discussion.
September 6, 2011
I am writing this short text from a computer whose keyboard settings are not English but Icelandic, a language with slightly more characters than English. As my fingers have learnt to seek blindly for the O’s and the U’s and the W’s, I keep spelling words wrongly, until of course I switch the keyboard to English. Then the issue becomes NOT to look, and let the fingers do their job on their own, since what the eyes see is not what the fingers meet when they try to type.
July 17, 2011
June 21, 2011
Summer is here, and for many academics, this is not just the season for relaxation but also the time for conference presentations. I know many colleagues who tremble at the thought of standing in front of an unknown and critically-minded audience who would potentially tear apart one’s every argument. I do not fear the presentation moment, on the contrary I always look forward to it as the time when my ideas, concocted in the solitude of my academic life get to breathe fresh air and receive the feedback that will refine them.
May 26, 2011
A short while ago, I had the pleasure and privilege of taking part in an online discussion about women’s leadership in higher education hosted by The
April 17, 2011
I confess having a hesitation when deciding on the title of my post today. Should it be administrators OR teachers? Maybe even administrators VERSUS teachers? Of course the last alternative would be an exaggeration, but I dare you to say that it never felt that there was such a tension at your university. I went with the conjunction AND because in the end this is what I’d like to discuss: the relationship between these two groups of hard working people that make universities go round.
March 23, 2011
I have recently been awarded a small course development grant meant to use blogs in the teaching of European studies. I already had an idea about what I wanted to do: help students create and administer a web space where information about European politics, media, culture, and student life is presented in bilingual fashion (with posts in Swedish or English and in the foreign language of choice or in the mother tongue of students in the Bachelor and Master respectively).
March 15, 2011
What will the university of the future look like?
February 15, 2011
Deanna wondered not
January 26, 2011
From the archives - this post was originally published at http://uvenus.org on 3.02.2010. To portray the situation of women in academia today is not a task meant for success in the space of 500 words. I will nevertheless try to describe briefly the situation in Sweden and to use that particular case as a springboard for more general thoughts about how it looks elsewhere and how it would be desirable to look everywhere in the future.

Pages

Back to Top