Anamaria Dutceac Segesten

Always the political scientist, Anamaria Dutceac Segesten is interested in power relations both in the social & political life and in the academia. She is currently a research fellow at the Center for Modern European Studies, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, and has worked previously at Lund University and Malmö University, both in Sweden. With experience from American and European higher education, her favorite topics at the University of Venus are the challenges of being a GenX woman in the academia, the future of the university, and the use of technology and social media in teaching social sciences and the humanities.

Anamaria likes to be creative in more than one way. For a year ago she was part of a team that started two new programs in European Studies at Lund University. Before that she created her own intensive summer course, and, of course designed several other courses related to EU politics and to the Balkan region. Other creative outlets are photography and knitting.

Anamaria loves languages: she is fluent in four and knowledgeable in four others. She likes to use them all while commenting on Twitter. You can find her blogging on education issues here and on her research project on eurosymbols here.

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Most Recent Articles

October 14, 2010
I return to one of my favorite subjects, blogging in the academia, but this time with a focus not on the students, as in my previous post, but on the scholar herself. I believe that blogging may be a useful tool for those of us involved in the process of creating (and communicating) new knowledge. How so? Because of the nature of blogging itself. Blogging = Reading + Writing + Linking + Commenting
September 14, 2010
Lund, Sweden
August 10, 2010
For academics of a certain age, having many fine balancing acts to prioritize is our prerogative. UVenus writers have blogged about the dilemmas of matching parenthood and work, working with both international and local students, and finding time for vacation and work. I am now facing yet another point of equilibrium: how do I make room for both research and teaching within the frame of my allotted working hours?
July 15, 2010
I am writing from my balcony, lit by the last rays of the sunset. It is almost 10:30 pm. Late sunsets are one of the unique beauties of the Swedish summer. With a bit of help from the weather gods, I will be sailing for the next few weeks along the Southern coast of Sweden, away from my office, my students and my coworkers.

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