Conditionally Accepted

Many individuals are drawn to higher education, including academic careers, because of academe’s potential for change. Countless prospective and current graduate students note that their desire to make a difference in their communities or society in general was their primary decision to attend graduate training. Unfortunately, many colleges and universities in the U.S. have practiced outright discrimination and exclusion throughout history, particularly against women, people of color, and disabled people/people with disabilities. 

Today, academe — like every social institution — is structured hierarchically, producing numerous professional and personal obstacles for academics from marginalized backgrounds. Scholars who are women, of color, lesbian, trans, bisexual, gay, queer, disabled, working-class or poor, immigrants, fat, religious and non-religious minorities, and/or single parents are faced daily with the difficult tension between academe's narrow definition of success and their own politics, identities, needs, happiness, and health.

Conditionally Accepted was created as a freestanding blog in July 2013 as an online space for scholars on the margins of academe. It has steadily grown since, becoming a career advice column for Inside Higher Ed in January 2016.  In this column, we provide news, information, personal stories, and resources for scholars who are, at best, conditionally accepted in academe. Conditionally Accepted is an anti-racist, pro-feminist, pro-queer, anti-transphobic, anti-fatphobic, anti-ableist, anti-ageist, anti-classist, and anti-xenophobic online community.

You can also like us on Facebook here and follow us on Twitter @conditionaccept.

 

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Conditionally Accepted Archive

July 29, 2016

I have graduate school to thank for the years of tension between my queer gender identity and the norms and expectations of academe, writes Eric Anthony Grollman.

July 22, 2016

Faculty members should identify gaps in their knowledge about gender, learn about transgender and nonbinary students, and implement some specific pedagogical practices, writes Stacy Jane Grover.

July 15, 2016

The difficulties of applying to academic positions begin before even submitting any applications, writes Alex Hanna.

July 8, 2016

Rachel McKinnon offers advice to administrators on how to handle the gender transitions of others on the campus.

July 1, 2016

From my own point of visibility, I am able to allow others to feel seen, to feel they are not alone, to feel their struggles and experiences are valid and recognized, writes Eric Anthony Grollman.

July 1, 2016

As a trans man who teaches courses on feminism, gender and women, there is a noticeable difference in how you approach the material, writes Seth.

June 24, 2016

Jeana Jorgensen give advice to those with scholarly training who are breaking into new areas far afield of traditional academe.

June 17, 2016

We should work to reduce the harm of bias in student course evaluations, argues Joey Sprague.

June 10, 2016

Tanya Golash-Boza gives faculty job applicants eight tips for writing a stellar diversity statement that stands out to search committees. 

June 3, 2016

LGBTQ folks pay a price for prioritizing their safety and well-being in academe -- often taking less stable or lower-paying positions to be in hospitable cities, writes Bonnie J. Morris.

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AUTHORS

Dr. Victor Ray, editor, I am an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Tennessee Knoxville. My research interests included race and organizations, critical race theory, and how formal organizational processes reproduce social inequalities. I am mixed race (black and white) but not tragic. And I am just as -- if not more -- objective than your average white scholar. In addition to my scholarly work and blogging, I have written about race for publications including Newsweek, Gawker, and Boston Review, and Seven Scribes. I occasionally tweet at @victorerikray.

 

Dr. Eric Anthony Grollman, founder, former editor and regular contributor, I speak as a black queer non-binary intellectual activist. I am currently a tenure-track professor in sociology at University of Richmond in Virginia. An “activist gone academic,” I pursued a Ph.D. in sociology at Indiana University to become a better activist. To my surprise, graduate training is designed to “beat the activist” out of grad students. Thus, I was traumatized in the process of earning my Ph.D. Those experiences led me to create Conditionally Accepted after I graduated in 2013 to make visible the scholars, perspectives, experiences, advice and resources that were not available to me. I write regularly, interweaving my personal experiences with my research (i.e., prejudice and discrimination) and current events, to reflect on the practices and policies that keep many scholars on the margins of academe. You can follow me on Twitter at @grollman.

 

 

Alicia Reyes-Barriéntez is an assistant professor of political science at Texas A&M-San Antonio. Her research examines the intersection of Latinx faith and politics. She earned a Ph.D. in political science from Duke University in 2016. While at Duke, she received the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Scholarship and Ford Foundation Dissertation Fellowship, two of the nation’s most prestigious fellowships awarded to doctoral students. She has a B.A. in Spanish and Latin American Studies (2005) and a M.A. in Spanish (2007) from Baylor University. She is also a Fellow at the J.G. Tower Center for Political Studies at Southern Methodist University. She has published in Politics & Identities and has a forthcoming article in Social Science Quarterly. Dr. Reyes-Barriéntez is a proud child of the U.S.-Mexico borderland colonias. She is a first-generation college graduate from a Mexican working-class immigrant family, and she calls Laredo, Texas home.


Alicia M. Reyes-Barriéntez, Ph.D. 

she/her/hers
Assistant Professor of Political Science
Texas A&M University-San Antonio
One University Way
San Antonio, Texas 78224
CAB 338
(210) 784-2260

[email protected]

 

Dr. Alvaro Huerta, Regular Contributor, I hold a joint faculty appointment in Urban & Region Planning (URP) and Ethnic & Women’s Studies (EWS) at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. As an interdisciplinary scholar, I teach and conduct research on the intersecting domains of community & economic development, Chicana/o & Latina/o studies, immigration & Mexican diaspora, social movements, social networks and the informal economy. I’m the author of the book Reframing the Latino Immigration Debate: Towards a Humanistic Paradigm and the forthcoming book Latina/o Immigrant Communities in the Xenophobic Era of Trump and Beyond. Prior to becoming a scholar-activist, I was a leading community activist in Los Angeles and beyond. As a son of Mexican immigrants, first generation graduate (with advanced degrees from UCLA & UC Berkeley) and product of violent and impoverished neighborhoods, among the aforementioned fields, my scholarly and public scholarship include issues related to immigration, race and class in higher education. Overall, I’m interested in the plight of the marginalized, excluded and demonized—where I come from.

 

BLOGROLL

There are many, many blogs for and/or by scholars on the margins of academia.  Below, you will find a general list of blogs, followed by those of particular social locations (e.g., women of color).  Please note that we do not wish to (mis)place people into identity boxes; rather, we offer loose categories to guide particular interests of our readers.

This is a growing list, so please let us know of others that we have missed!

Click to view Blogroll
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Critical Blogs:

Women of Color:

Fat Women:

Women:

People of Color:

LGBT and Queer People:

Trans* and Gender Non-Conforming People:

LGBT and Queer People of Color:

Lesbian, Queer, and Bisexual Women:

Disabled People/People with Disabilities:

Poor and Working-Class People:

Liberal Arts Careers:

Alternative Careers:

Contingent Faculty:

Advice Blogs:

General Academic Blogs:

Educational Blogs:

 

 

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