Dana Campbell

Dana Campbell finished her PhD in evolutionary biology from Harvard University in 1999. Since then she has enjoyed the benefits of exploring many topics in biology as an independent scholar and at-home mom in Maryland. She spends summers with her husband and two daughters, ages 5 and 9, at the University of Washington marine biology research labs in the beautiful San Juan Islands.

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Most Recent Articles

May 12, 2010
In surfing around the web I came upon this old thread, started in January last year on the Chronicle's “Balancing work and life” forum, and then picked up again in June. A young tenure-track faculty member at a research-intensive university with two under-two year olds started the thread with the post: “I’m thinking of leaving academia” (for the reasons that she has become overwhelmed with balancing the job and family.
April 27, 2010
How many five minute intervals have passed me by completely unproductively in my life… I hate to think. (Heck, I’ve had half-hour and hour and day-long intervals be unproductive, too, but that’s another story.) In some ways, five minutes is like a penny – you don’t notice it’s gone, you don’t stop to pick it up, you don’t worry about it. But someone recently suggested to me a five-minute activity that has been completely rewarding every single time I’ve done it. We call it “Special 5”. This is time that I give to my 11-year-old daughter, for just the two of us.
April 13, 2010
I’m a mom, who has prioritized full-time parenting, and I stand in the sidelines of academia. This can be painful, I am no longer considered an expert in my field; the traditional route is pretty well closed and it’s unclear how to balance my work passions from home, blah, blah, blah; I’ve written about this before.
March 24, 2010
A recent piece in The New York Times discusses a trend in parenting that they call the “Mommy Wars”: competitive, judgmental child rearing. Several contributors to this discussion suggest that the web is responsible for this trend - the anonymous and ever-present, often first source of information from parenting sites, comments, and blogs.
March 10, 2010
I’m a great one for To Do lists. For me they work especially well when I’m organized enough to have items broken down into bite-sized projects that I can go along and knock off. When my lists are working well I rarely finish everything on it in one day. I rewrite my list and re-prioritize all the items that don’t get crossed off along with the new things that come up each night for the next day. I keep all the lists in sequential pages of a notebook, so I can refer back to old ones, and they become a reference of what I have done.
February 17, 2010
At the beginning of November I blogged about our first meeting of the SS-MD-BC (second Sunday mother-daughter book club) my daughter and her friends started. I very much appreciated your comments (my new year’s resolution is to be better about responding to blog comments). Since there was interest in hearing more about our selections, I thought I’d catch you up on the books the girls have chosen since then.
January 27, 2010
I snow-balled a meltdown as I hurrumphed around this evening, distressed at the resistance of my family to help out with dinner and other immediate chores. In fact, for the last several days, maybe a week, our household has been edgy and uncomfortable; tonight things fell apart very easily. My husband glued himself to his computer shortly after walking in the door.
January 13, 2010
Happy New Year everyone! Having passed through to the other side of our most consumer-driven season of the year, maybe you have seen this Toys R Us advertisement flier that was posted on Sociological Images, a blog associated with Contexts magazine? Toys ‘R’ Us has a line of “Edu-science” toys, which includes telescopes and microscopes.
December 16, 2009
Two weeks ago I reported on a proposal about to come up for vote in the University of Maryland senate to relax family leave policy. So here’s the update: it passed in the senate. Before it becomes university policy it will need to be approved by President Dan Mote, which looks promising; he has been cited as supportive of this measure. This proposal will allow faculty to reduce their loads (and the salary, commensurately) down to 50% while they are raising children under five.
December 2, 2009
I found this article in the University of Maryland student newspaper last week describing an effort to expand family leave at UMD, at least for tenure-track faculty. Next week, the University senate will vote on a proposal which would allow faculty members to request up to 50% reduction in their work for up to two years (with proportional pay cut) to take care of any children under the age of five. Their tenure clock would also be commensurately slowed.

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