Dayna Catropa

Dayna Catropa is Associate Director, Research Programs, in the Office of the President at Harvard University.  Throughout her career, Dayna has blended her business and education background, dedicating herself to helping organizations make decisions that are both economically and educationally sound.

At Harvard, Dayna focuses on strategic research and programs.  She also co-teaches a new course called Strategy and Competition in Higher Education.

 Dayna earned a B.S. in Applied Economics and Management, magna cum laude, from Cornell University and a Master’s in Education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

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Most Recent Articles

February 24, 2014
A creative option.
February 2, 2014
LEGOs have gone digital.
January 14, 2014
The demand for entrepreneurship education continues to increase.
December 15, 2013
Technology is changing everything.
November 11, 2013
   
October 27, 2013
An option for programmers.
October 21, 2013
The Wall Street Journal recently posed this question: “Why aren’t companies getting graduates with the skills they need?”
October 15, 2013
Expanding options?
September 30, 2013
Will this new school lead to better outcomes?
September 16, 2013
Thinking about student demographics.

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April 30, 2015
We originally thought that business schools might be the first to feel the heat of the changing market for higher education. Turns out that may not be true – it might be the undergraduate market, quickly followed by the rest of higher education. 
January 26, 2014
Lately it seems you can’t read about higher education without thinking about disruption.  Based on some recent developments, business schools may be the first to feel the heat. 
March 4, 2013
When we asked people that have been working in higher ed for more than a year for advice to people entering in similar positions to them, we received a wide variety of suggestions.  In this post we’ll share what administrators (who represented 36% of the 464 survey respondents, respectively) would advise those just entering a similar role. 
February 27, 2013
When we asked people that have been working in higher education for more than a year for advice to people entering in similar positions to them, we received a wide variety of suggestions.  In this post we’ll share what tenure-track faculty (who represented 17% of all combined 464 survey respondents) would advise those just entering the tenure track.
February 8, 2013
In a previous post, we shared responses to the question “What has been the most significant change (either positive or negative) in the higher education 'industry' since you began working in it?"  Although answers relating to the increased influence of business in higher ed and the ‘corporatization’ of the university came in fourth place in terms of number of mentions (close to a three-way tie for second, though), it would have come in first place had we measured responses by the heat or passion of the response.
January 27, 2013
As we reported earlier this month, we have started rolling out the results of our fall surveys with those newer-to-higher ed (“newbies”) and those that have been in higher ed for a longer period of time (“veterans”).  Today we’ll let you know what respondents told us the most significant change (positive or negative) that they have seen since they started working in higher ed.
January 21, 2013
We recently revealed the results of one of our survey questions, “What Surprised You When You First Started Working in Higher Education”   After the most common answer, “the politics,” next on the list was the slow pace of accomplishing change in higher education. 
January 17, 2013
  Our post on “What Surprised You When You First Started Working in Higher Education” (the results of our brief survey) generated a fair number of emails and tweets about the politics in higher education, so we thought we would look into this area a bit more for today’s post.
January 10, 2013
As we reported last week, we have started rolling out the results of our fall surveys with those newer-to-higher ed (“newbies”) and those that have been in higher ed for a longer period of time (“veterans”).  Today we’ll let you know what these 464 people told us about why they decided to work in higher ed.
January 4, 2013
Thank you to the 464 of you that took the time to share your thoughts with us about your reasons for working in higher education, what has surprised you and, for those of you that have been in higher education for a while, what has changed.  Here is the first of several posts that will share results from the survey.

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