Dayna Catropa

Dayna Catropa is Associate Director, Research and Marketing Programs, at Harvard University’s Division of Continuing Education.  Throughout her career, Dayna has blended her business and education background, dedicating herself to helping organizations make decisions that are both economically and educationally sound.

At Harvard, Dayna focuses on strategic research and marketing programs.  She also co-teaches a new course called Strategy and Competition in Higher Education.

In her previous role as a Consultant at Eduventures, Dayna worked with higher education clients nationwide to identify and prioritize growth opportunities, forecast market performance, and develop market entry and positioning strategies. As part of the new program development team, Dayna helped launch a collaborative research group focused on Student Affairs.

Dayna has also provided marketing expertise to Fortune 100 financial services and telecommunications firms.

 Dayna earned a B.S. in Applied Economics and Management, magna cum laude, from Cornell University and a Master’s in Education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

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Most Recent Articles

September 9, 2013
How has the distribution of student debt changed over time?
September 5, 2013
Positive unintended consequences?
August 26, 2013
What are prospective students searching for? 
August 19, 2013
Connecting students with alumni and organizations.
August 13, 2013
Letting students know the options.
August 6, 2013
Despite the many resources available in high school and college, it can seem like an overwhelming challenge to choose a career path.
July 5, 2013
Communicating a shared purpose can inspire any team to focus on why they do what they do, in addition to the tasks at hand.
June 24, 2013
Will potential students wind up more confused?
June 10, 2013
A headline in Forbes this week caught my eye -- “It’s Official! The End of Competitive Advantage.”  I was intrigued.
May 28, 2013
A central brainstorming tenet is that every idea – big, small, simple or extraordinary - should be considered. Most good ideas do not occur spontaneously in an individual’s mind.

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