Dayna Catropa

Dayna Catropa is Associate Director, Research and Marketing Programs, at Harvard University’s Division of Continuing Education.  Throughout her career, Dayna has blended her business and education background, dedicating herself to helping organizations make decisions that are both economically and educationally sound.

At Harvard, Dayna focuses on strategic research and marketing programs.  She also co-teaches a new course called Strategy and Competition in Higher Education.

In her previous role as a Consultant at Eduventures, Dayna worked with higher education clients nationwide to identify and prioritize growth opportunities, forecast market performance, and develop market entry and positioning strategies. As part of the new program development team, Dayna helped launch a collaborative research group focused on Student Affairs.

Dayna has also provided marketing expertise to Fortune 100 financial services and telecommunications firms.

 Dayna earned a B.S. in Applied Economics and Management, magna cum laude, from Cornell University and a Master’s in Education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

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Most Recent Articles

February 3, 2013
The National Bureau of Economic Research published the “College as Country Club” paper last week. It has gotten a lot of coverage already by IHE, the Chronicle of Higher Education, TIME, the Wall Street Journal, and Freakonomics. 
January 27, 2013
As we reported earlier this month, we have started rolling out the results of our fall surveys with those newer-to-higher ed (“newbies”) and those that have been in higher ed for a longer period of time (“veterans”).  Today we’ll let you know what respondents told us the most significant change (positive or negative) that they have seen since they started working in higher ed.
January 21, 2013
We recently revealed the results of one of our survey questions, “What Surprised You When You First Started Working in Higher Education”   After the most common answer, “the politics,” next on the list was the slow pace of accomplishing change in higher education. 
January 13, 2013
As we reported earlier this month, we have started rolling out the results of our fall surveys with those newer-to-higher ed (“newbies”) and those that have been in higher ed for a longer period of time (“veterans”).  Today we’ll let you know what these 459 people told us about what surprised them when they first started working in higher ed.
January 6, 2013
The “end of history illusion” was coined by Daniel Gilbert and his colleagues. Their research, cited in last week’s NPR article You Can’t See it, But You’ll be a Different Person in 10 Years, showed that people tend to underestimate how much they will change in the future.
December 16, 2012
In a previous post we predicted that this year MOOCs will morph into MOCCS (Mid-Sized Online Closed Courses).
December 9, 2012
The Pew Research Center recently released two different reports that call attention to at least one of the issues in higher education. 
November 18, 2012
Marketing departments and individuals alike are increasingly generating content to share via social media. Have you ever wondered the lifespan of a link you share?  How long does it have a chance of actually getting clicked?
November 12, 2012
An interesting question caught my eye recently: what’s the half-life of knowledge, for facts we think we know?  
October 28, 2012
Last week’s StratEDgy post focused on Social Media and Teaching.  Faculty reported that one barrier preventing them from using social media was a concern about privacy.  As a counterpoint to that perspective, here our attention is on student use of social media.  Most students have the opposite problem – a sort of apathy toward privacy issues. 

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