Denise Horn

Denise is a mover, a shaker and a world traveler. When Denise isn’t traveling for teaching and research, she calls Boston, Massachusetts her home. She is an Assistant Professor of International Affairs at Northeastern University, and received her PhD from Rutgers University.

Denise is the author of Women, Civil Society and the Geopolitics of Democratization (Routledge 2010) and the forthcoming book Democratic Governance and Social Entrepreneurship: Civic Participation and the Future of Democracy (Routledge 2012). Her research explores the relationship of civil society development to democratic growth, focusing on transnational activism and trends in global development. She has conducted field research in Eastern Europe, Southeast Asia and India. Denise also directs the Northeastern University Global Corps Practicum, which introduces students to social entrepreneurship in countries such as India, Indonesia and Thailand.

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Most Recent Articles

January 2, 2012
My first book was the result of years of graduate work and was born of my dissertation. It had gone through multiple iterations and critiques from my adviser and dissertation committee. In the end, I felt as though the whole project was out of my hands, and I was simply responding to the demands of others. Of course, that is the point — as a graduate student, you are being shaped to join the ranks of academics who speak the same (metaphoric) language and share similar expectations for academic work.
November 13, 2011
I spent the day grading my midterms, never a fun task. Usually I get into a vague kind of automaton state; as I read for key phrases, look for definitions and the critical use of concepts, and references to key authors and guest speakers. Check, check, check, grade. But this time, I noticed a pattern that I’m sure I’ve seen before but just ignored. It is the gendered attribution that says so much about how students view “authority” (in the author sense) in academia.
October 13, 2011
The ongoing Occupy Wall Street protests have spread to Boston, and most notably to our university. International Affairs students particularly seem drawn to social activism of this sort and the opportunity to participate in a nationwide protest movement has brought a new sense of excitement to campus.
September 11, 2011
I just turned forty and began worrying about catching a terrible disease from my students.
July 12, 2011
What happens when your scholarship is considered a crime? When the state tries to stop you? What do you do when you know what you must write could potentially land you in jail? Do we have a responsibility to write, or is this purely a selfish endeavor?
June 27, 2011
I’m rejuvenated, revived and relaxed. I feel smart again. Why? I’ve spent the week being an intellectual kid again. Denise exploring the politics of the Western Wall Tunnels, on her recent trip to Israel.
May 15, 2011
I Quit.
May 4, 2011
In her well-known 1984 essay, “Sex and Death in the Rational World of Defense Intellectuals,” Carol Cohn writes of her experience in a defense seminar in the early 1980s, when the cold war was hot again and missile defense less a question than a Reagan-inspired reality. The essay is often (mis)cited as dealing specifically with the gendered language of the defense community–missile size, “Little Boy” and “Fat Man,” missile silos as “nice holes”–it’s easy to get caught up in that part of the essay, but it’s so much more than that.
April 5, 2011
This month’s question regarding life balance—how we deal with writer’s block—started me thinking about how I feel about writing. It’s always been an important part of my life, but in my career as an academic, writing has become my biggest source of anxiety.
March 6, 2011
I have friends who are well advanced in their (non-academic) careers—they are senior managers, higher-ups in government bureaucracies, established account and movie executives. They pay mortgages, have children, talk about their investments and have all the trappings of late 30-something, early 40-somethings that we generally associate with that population. They are grown-ups. Despite being in the same age cohort, however, I don’t feel like a grown-up, really. I feel more like a grown-up in waiting.

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