Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times, USA Today, the Nieman Foundation Journal, The Christian Science Monitor, and the Princeton Alumni Weekly. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his wife, Sandy, and their two children in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

April 15, 2014
The United States' historical strength in biomedical research faces longterm decline because assumptions about never-ending growth have run headlong into a decade's worth of funding declines, a quartet of esteemed science leaders argues in a new article (abstract available here) in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
April 15, 2014
Maybe you should let your children play with their food! In today’s Academic Minute, the University of Iowa's Larissa Samuelson asserts that playing with one's food might be a beneficial part of the learning process.
April 14, 2014
The feeling of gratitude can positively influence all the other factors of one's life. In today’s Academic Minute, Hofstra University's Jeffrey Froh describes the far reaching effects that gratitude has on children.
April 11, 2014
Studying how insects metabolize and process oxygen could bring some relief for farmers hoping to protect their crops without using dangerous pesticides. In today’s Academic Minute, Union College's Scott Kirkton discusses the biochemistry that triggers a grasshopper's molting process.
April 10, 2014
In effort to ward off mounting criticism of accreditation, the seven regional agencies collaborate to align their punishments and how they impose them.
April 10, 2014
College sports had another first Wednesday, with Derrick Gordon of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst becoming the first openly gay man on a Division I men's basketball team. Gordon, a sophomore, told his story to ESPN and Outsports.
April 10, 2014
The clarity of one's memories is referred to as memory resolution. In today’s Academic Minute, Vanderbilt University's Phillip Ko explores the sharpness of memory to better understand the aging of the brain, memory loss and diseases like Alzheimer's.
April 9, 2014
Studying the DNA of the ancient Amborella flower is opening up new insights into the evolution of certain plants and animals. In today’s Academic Minute, the University of Buffalo's Victor Albert looks at the ancient origins of this Amborella and works to sequence its genome in order to better understand how life has developed on Earth.
April 8, 2014
"The Completion Agenda" is a free compilation of articles -- in print-on-demand format -- about the drive to increase the number of Americans with college credentials. The articles reflect challenges faced by colleges, and some of the key strategies they are adopting. Download the booklet here.
April 8, 2014
In today’s Academic Minute, Aarhus University's Hans Meltofte discusses the negative impact of climate change in this area as "already visible" and details the serious ecological consequences that are resulting.

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Co-Authored Articles

March 4, 2011
March 4, 2011 -- The 2011 Inside Higher Ed Survey of College and University Presidents, which can be seen here, is the first in a series of surveys of senior campus officials about key issues in higher education. Inside Higher Ed collaborated on this project with Kenneth C. Green, founding director of the Campus Computing Project. The Inside Higher Ed Survey of College and University Presidents was made possible in part by the generous financial support of Kaplan Global Solutions, Pearson, and SunGard Higher Education.
September 28, 2010
President Obama signals concern about rapidly rising tuitions; GAO reports on state records systems and student privacy.
August 4, 2010
WASHINGTON -- The public comment period for the majority of the U.S. Department of Education’s proposed regulations aimed at protecting the integrity of the Title IV federal financial aid program ended at midnight Tuesday.
May 10, 2010
Amid increasing federal scrutiny of college sports comes the latest salvo: the U.S. Department of Justice‘s inquiry into the National Collegiate Athletic Association’s scholarship rules.
January 19, 2009
Overshadowing other news from the NCAA convention, Myles Brand publicly confirms illness and describes his long-term prognosis as "not good."
December 10, 2008
Regional association cites Alabama A&M and Webber International for financial shortcomings, lifts sanction against Texas Tech, and says Virginia Commonwealth has responded adequately to scandal.
July 12, 2007
At financial aid directors' meeting, sessions explore best practices on student financial literacy and assess 2 new federal aid programs.
May 23, 2007
Congress seems poised to expand tuition tax breaks for students, but will colleges be taxed more to pay for them?
April 2, 2007
Some institutions accept N.Y. attorney general's settlement offer to change student loan practices and repay disputed funds.
March 9, 2007
A House of Representatives subcommittee lambasted college leaders Thursday for their perceived failure in stemming the illegal downloading of music and movies by students. Committee members, responding to complaints by the entertainment industry that campuses have been slow to restrict copyright infringement, pressed for answers and made vague threats about possible changes in intellectual property law that could result if higher education as a whole does not adopt a more aggressive approach.

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