Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times, USA Today, the Nieman Foundation Journal, The Christian Science Monitor, and the Princeton Alumni Weekly. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his wife, Sandy, and their two children in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

May 19, 2014
Stepping into the breach for college commencement speakers sidelined by protests, retired university leaders defend importance of debate -- and one calls protesters "immature" and "arrogant."
May 16, 2014
On our May 16 newscast, Macaulay Honors College's Ann Kirschner and S. Georgia Nugent, former president of Kenyon College and a senior fellow at the Council of Independent Colleges, join Inside Higher Ed's Scott Jaschik and Doug Lederman to discuss the recent spate of controversies over protested (and withdrawn) commencement speakers, new data on college enrollments, research on the efficacy of lecture-based vs. active learning in science courses, and vigilantism over campus sexual assaults.
May 16, 2014
As hip hop culture expands, schools are expanding with it. In today’s Academic Minute, Michigan State University's Muhammad Khalifa studies this trend.
May 16, 2014
Education Department invites applications for First in the World program, designed to spur ideas to increase access and completion and drive down costs.
May 15, 2014
The National Collegiate Athletic Association offered its usual good news/bad news report on athletes’ academic progress on Wednesday. To the satisfaction of President Mark Emmert and other association officials, the Academic Progress Rates for Division I athletes over all and for players in several historically underperforming sports – football, men’s and women’s basketball, and baseball – all continued to rise.
May 15, 2014
Can math be used to better understand history? In today’s Academic Minute, the University of Connecticut's Peter Turchin is doing just that through complex mathematical algorithms.
May 15, 2014
Sheri Noren Everts, provost and vice president for academic affairs at Illinois State University, has been selected as chancellor of Appalachian State University, in North Carolina. Timothy Foster, chairman of Concorde Career Colleges, has been named CEO there as well.
May 14, 2014
The Latin name myotonia congenita might not mean much to you, but you've likely seen them in action. In today's Academic Minute, Virginia Tech's Phillip Sponenberg fills us in on one of the Internet's favorite animal oddities: the fainting goat.
May 14, 2014
With colleges under increasing pressure to prove that they are providing value to their students, many of them are seeking new and better ways to gauge the success of their alumni. (Gallup and Purdue University last week rolled out one such approach to much fanfare.)
May 14, 2014
William E. (Brit) Kirwan will retire as chancellor of the University System of Maryland when his successor is chosen, the university system announced Tuesday. Kirwan has headed the Maryland system for 12 years, and also served as president of its flagship campus, in College Park, from 1988 to 1998. In between, he headed Ohio State University.

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