Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times, USA Today, the Nieman Foundation Journal, The Christian Science Monitor, and the Princeton Alumni Weekly. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his wife, Sandy, and their two children in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

July 17, 2014
Gordon College, whose policies barring sex outside of heterosexual marriage and request for an exemption from federal antidiscrimination requirements have drawn significant attention in recent weeks, has "no chance" of having its institutional accreditation withdrawn in the coming months over the policies according to its accreditor, the Boston Business Journal
July 16, 2014
Gettysburg College has expelled, suspended or otherwise punished 27 students who were found to have violated the Pennsylvania institution's policies stemming from a Philadelphia-area drug ring that ensnared other colleges, too, The Morning Call of Allentown reported.
July 16, 2014
Citing procedural reasons, a federal appeals court on Tuesday ordered a lower court to grant a new trial to a Teresa R. Wagner, who has waged a multiyear legal campaign to show that the University of Iowa discriminated against her because of her conservative political views.
July 16, 2014
Every day, new reports emerge of identity theft and other security breaches. In today's Academic Minute, the National University of Singapore's Artur Ekert describes his study of cryptography and improving security systems.
July 16, 2014
Daniel J. Bernardo, interim provost and executive vice president at Washington State University, has been named to the job on a permanent basis. Jack P. Calareso, president of Anna Maria College, in Massachusetts, has been chosen as president of St. Joseph's College, in New York.
July 15, 2014
A federal appeals court today upheld the University of Texas at Austin's consideration of race in admissions. The ruling came in a case in which the U.S. Supreme Court ruled last year that public colleges could consider race in admissions, but only under strict conditions. Critics of affirmative action have hoped that those conditions were sufficiently narrow that when the appeals court took another look at UT Austin's admissions policies, they would not meet those tests.
July 15, 2014
A pair of Congressional lawmakers, one Democrat and one Republican, introduced legislation Monday that would compel colleges (including private institutions), conferences and the National Collegiate Athletic Association itself to provide broad financial data that the federal government would publish, USA Today reported. U.S. Reps.
July 15, 2014
A process known as rescue karyotyping is allowing doctors to look back into the genetic history of a miscarriage. In today's Academic Minute, Albert Einstein College of Medicine's Zev Williams explains this analytic technique.
July 14, 2014
How a child learns about the concept of safety depends greatly on the conversations they have with their parents. In today's Academic Minute, the University of Iowa's Jodie M. Plumert discusses her experiment to understand how safety and danger are perceived.
July 11, 2014
Our July 11 program explored the attempted ouster of the president of the University of Texas at Austin and the results of a U.S. senator's survey of campus handling of sexual assaults. In a discussion with Inside Higher Ed's Scott Jaschik and This Week moderator Casey Green, the Association of American Universities' Hunter Rawlings III discussed the clash involving Bill Powers, president of UT-Austin, Chancellor Francisco Cigarroa and the board of the UT system (with Governor Rick Perry in the wings). And in our other segment, Laura Dunn of SurvJustice and Kevin Kruger of NASPA: Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education examined Senator Claire McCaskill's study of how colleges prevent and respond to sexual assault.

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Co-Authored Articles

April 2, 2007
Some institutions accept N.Y. attorney general's settlement offer to change student loan practices and repay disputed funds.
March 9, 2007
A House of Representatives subcommittee lambasted college leaders Thursday for their perceived failure in stemming the illegal downloading of music and movies by students. Committee members, responding to complaints by the entertainment industry that campuses have been slow to restrict copyright infringement, pressed for answers and made vague threats about possible changes in intellectual property law that could result if higher education as a whole does not adopt a more aggressive approach.
February 1, 2007
The U.S. House of Representatives approved legislation Wednesday that would raise the value of the maximum Pell Grant for the first time since 2002 and increase spending for several key academic research programs. Dozens of Republicans joined all but two Democrats in voting for House Joint Resolution 20, which would finance the operations of much of the federal government through the rest of the 2007 fiscal year, which began in October.
January 31, 2007
At meeting of accreditors, officials acknowledge need to measure student learning, but fear oversimplification.

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