Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times, USA Today, the Nieman Foundation Journal, The Christian Science Monitor, and the Princeton Alumni Weekly. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his wife, Sandy, and their two children in Bethesda, Md.

To reach this person, click here.

Most Recent Articles

June 27, 2014
The June 27 edition of our weekly audio newscast featured William Durden and Ann Kirschner -- college leaders with experience in for-profit higher education and at liberal arts institutions -- in a discussion about pressures on both sectors.
June 26, 2014
Imagine the medical possibilities of monitoring a person’s digestive tract from the inside out. In today's Academic Minute, Harvard Medical School's Jonathan Kotula discusses how he and and his colleagues engineered bacteria to sense environmental signals within the mammalian gut.
June 25, 2014
Racism isn’t always an overt display of prejudiced behavior or language. In today's Academic Minute, Oakton Community College's Keith Johnson discusses microaggression, small acts and subtle behavior that may be interpreted as racially biased.
June 25, 2014
Reports suggest: College is still worth it. The student loan debt problem isn't that bad. And federal financial aid drives tuition higher and should refocus on the neediest.
June 24, 2014
The University of Southern California announced Monday that all of its football and men's and women's basketball scholarships would last for four years, instead of being the common one-year renewable grant. While it is commonly assumed that college athletic scholarships are for four years, the reality is that most are not -- an issue that has surfaced frequently in the growing debate over whether college athletes are treated fairly.
June 24, 2014
Chapman University has agreed to pay $75,000 and mandate training for its business school professors to settle a lawsuit brought by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission on behalf of a former professor there, The Orange County Register reported. Stephanie Dellande had alleged that the California institution denied her tenure and fired her because of her race. Chapman officials denied any wrongdoing in the case and said they settled it to end the costly litigation.
June 24, 2014
USA Today reports that more universities are reconsidering the bans many of them have had on the sale of beer at sporting events, especially football games. The article says that many programs, particularly in the South, are holding firm on their longstanding opposition to selling alcohol, for philosophical reasons and concerns related to fan safety.
June 24, 2014
Farmers want to maximize the land where they cultivate their crops. But in today's Academic Minute, Colorado State University's Meagan Schipanski suggests that it might be beneficial to alternate planting cash crops with cover crops.
June 23, 2014
The net price paid by students rose by an average of 10.5 percent from 2008 to 2013 at 33 independent colleges examined by The Boston Globe, faster than inflation, the newspaper reported. The Globe's study found that net price -- the amount paid by students after financial aid was awarded -- rose by at least 15 percent at 11 of the 33 institutions.
June 23, 2014
Scholars at four American institutions were among the five recipients announced Monday of the Breakthrough Prize in Mathematics, the newest competition in the increasingly lucrative field of mathematics, The New York Times reported.

Pages

Back to Top