Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times, USA Today, the Nieman Foundation Journal, The Christian Science Monitor, and the Princeton Alumni Weekly. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his wife, Sandy, and their two children in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

March 7, 2006
Monday's announcement that two private equity firms had agreed to pay $3.4 billion to buy Education Management Corp. means at least one thing: Some well-known and well-heeled financial folks decided that one of the country's most successful publicly held providers of for-profit higher education was a smart investment.
March 7, 2006
Unanimous court ruling in Pentagon case means colleges must grant full access to military recruiters or lose funds.
March 6, 2006
Unanimous U.S. Supreme Court says Solomon Amendment does not violate law schools' rights.
March 6, 2006
Federal scrutiny of governance is good, but law or regulation would be a mistake, guests tell Congressional aides.
March 2, 2006
For first time, NCAA penalizes its members based on athletes' academic underperformance, trying to compel improvement.
February 28, 2006
Monsanto agrees to pay $100 million up front and at least $5 million a year in royalties to end dispute over cow growth hormone.
February 24, 2006
Treatment of prominent Indian scientist in visa process seen as damaging U.S. progress in attracting foreign researchers.

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