Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times, USA Today, the Nieman Foundation Journal, The Christian Science Monitor, and the Princeton Alumni Weekly. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his wife, Sandy, and their two children in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

February 17, 2006
Contributions to colleges rose by 4.9 percent in 2005, a second straight increase.
February 16, 2006
Ohio State breached its contract with a former basketball coach when it fired him for NCAA violations, a judge rules.
February 15, 2006
As federal panel talks of testing what students learn, college officials accept accountability but fear a national mandate.
February 13, 2006
University will cover full tuition and fees for all students, including transfers, and freshmen who qualify for Pell Grants.
February 10, 2006
Diploma mill operators often manage to stay one step ahead of the law, changing their location or how they operate whenever state or other authorities zero in for a crackdown. And the laws and other tools available to regulators, higher education officials, students and others to stop degree mill operators are few and flimsy. So occasionally they turn to alternative tactics to fight the degree mills and other companies that help them do business.
February 10, 2006
As many as 1.5 million college students who probably would have qualified for Pell Grants in 2003-4 did not apply for federal financial aid, according to a study by the American Council on Education. A report on the study estimates that that number is up 76 percent over 1999-2000, and concludes that "more outreach is needed to inform low- and moderate-income students about the availability of financial aid and the application process."
February 8, 2006
After Senate aide warns private college officials about scrutiny on compensation issues, Santorum butters them up.

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