Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times, USA Today, the Nieman Foundation Journal, The Christian Science Monitor, and the Princeton Alumni Weekly. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his wife, Sandy, and their two children in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

July 21, 2005
In wide-ranging session, House committee confronts Horowitz, Title IX and 'anti-American activity.'
July 20, 2005
A third of Division I colleges vote to override plan to boost scholarship increases in four women's sports.
July 20, 2005
Agency finds Career Education campus violated law and restricts its ability to operate in the state.
July 19, 2005
Plan to revamp undergraduate education by eliminating 3 separate colleges draws criticism from supporters of women's education.
July 18, 2005
Federal costs would balloon and efficiency would erode if either student loan program vanished, a study finds.
July 15, 2005
Appropriations panel backs plan to raise NIH spending by $1 billion but keep maximum Pell Grant at $4,050.
July 15, 2005
As they waited Thursday morning for the House of Representatives higher education subcommittee to vote on legislation to extend the Higher Education Act, lobbyists for for-profit and nonprofit colleges had strikingly different answers to the simple question "How are things going?" Bruce D. Leftwich, vice president for government relations at the Career College Association, responded with an enthusiastic "Great, great." David S. Baime, who plays the same role for the American Association of Community Colleges, offered an uncertain "I have no idea."
July 14, 2005
Debate is intense over for-profit colleges, but decisions on many issues are forestalled.
July 12, 2005
Some of the world's leading research universities plan a new cooperative venture in which they will share faculty members and students and build what its leaders call a "global partnership." Details about the arrangement are vague -- so vague, in fact, that officials at the two American institutions planning to be involved, Yale and the University of California at Berkeley, aren't ready to talk about it yet.

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