Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times, USA Today, the Nieman Foundation Journal, The Christian Science Monitor, and the Princeton Alumni Weekly. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his wife, Sandy, and their two children in Bethesda, Md.

To reach this person, click here.

Most Recent Articles

February 2, 2005
Regulating diploma mills is a little like herding cats. The institutions, which offer fraudulent degrees in exchange for cash and little or no academic work, crop up overnight and disappear nearly as fast, when consumer complaints rise or law enforcement officials catch the scent. State and federal lawmakers yearn to crack down on these "colleges," but because they're hard to define and hard to nail down, there's often little they can do.
February 1, 2005
A federal appeals court on Monday breathed new life into a long-running legal battle between two competing student loan companies. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit overturned a lower court jury's 2003 ruling siding with Sallie Mae in a lawsuit brought by College Loan Corporation.
February 1, 2005
"Rising Faculty Star" features e-mail interviews with up-and-coming young professors about their backgrounds, their work and their career arcs, among other things. Alison Farmer, a fifth-year graduate student in astrophysics at Caltech, was all over the Astrophysics Rumor Mill this winter; she received fellowship offers from MIT, Berkeley and Harvard. Q: What drew you to astrophysics?
January 28, 2005
As enrollments at American colleges continue to soar, vaulting past the 17 million mark in fall 2002, students grow ever more likely to be black or Hispanic and female and to attend community colleges or for-profit institutions, according to the latest statistics from the U.S. Education Department.
January 28, 2005
As "60 Minutes" prepares to broadcast a potentially damaging report on for-profit colleges, the Career College Association has begun a public relations campaign aimed at dealing with "any fallout here in Washington or elsewhere," the group's president said in an e-mail to its members last week.
January 24, 2005
In 'mutual' decision, Baylor's president decides to step aside amid mounting criticism over the direction of the institution.
January 20, 2005
The University of Pennsylvania has wrapped up its grand experiment in curricular reform.
January 20, 2005
Minnesota's governor wants his state to copy a Colorado college financing system that hasn't begun, let alone been proven to work.
January 20, 2005
Two days after UVa altered its policies to reduce students' loan burdens, Williams increases its grant levels.
January 18, 2005
A year ago, the University of Virginia joined the growing list of selective institutions altering their financial aid policies to make them friendlier to students from low-income families. Now it has decided that it needs to do even more, and do it sooner, than originally planned.

Pages

Back to Top