Elizabeth Lewis Pardoe

Elizabeth Lewis Pardoe is a faculty brat with an enduring case of wanderlust. She spreads the contagion as associate director of the Office of Fellowships at Northwestern University, her undergraduate alma mater. She earned masters degrees in European history as a Marshall Scholar at Cambridge University before completing her doctorate in American history at Princeton. Beth perseveres as the lone source of estrogen in a household otherwise populated by rambunctious boys: her husband, two sons, and a border terrier. In her so-called spare time, she fights household entropy, gardens, bakes boozy bundts, enjoys breakfast in Bollywood, and writes scholarly papers about funky monks.

For more, visit http://elizabethlewispardoe.wordpress.com or find Elizabeth on Twitter@ejlp.

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Most Recent Articles

November 2, 2010
Anyone in the academy already knows that if a letter of recommendation praises a student as a ‘hard worker,’ the subtext reads, ‘not very bright.’ High prestige scholarships put a high premium on leadership and service to others, but at some point in the transition from Gen X to Gen Y, service fell to a distant second place. Every student I meet seems to have attended some sort of leadership seminar, institute, or retreat and leads something. Most have founded an NGO. Scholarship administrators fume that while many have founded, few have achieved much of anything.
October 3, 2010
The two most misused nouns in the American academy are “Professor” and “administration.” In a recent New York Times piece, “The Case of the Vanishing Full-Time Professor,” Samantha Stainburn wrote of the disappointment parents feel upon discovering that their child’s “Professor” is an adjunct, which means in most cases the instructor is NOT a Professor at all.
August 1, 2010
My sons and I hold a recurrent discussion about the reason school lets out in early June and resumes on the cusp of September. They adhere to the notion that a summer vacation came to them as a birthright. I point out the critical difference between the break they receive and the vacation they claim.

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