Eric Stoller

Eric Stoller is a higher education thought-leader, consultant, writer, and speaker. He frequently gives keynotes on how administrators can use social media strategically and is a proponent for teaching students about digital identity development.

With a background in student affairs, academic advising, wellness, technology, and communications, Eric focuses his energies on educating clients and captivating audiences. As the Student Affairs and Technology blogger for Inside Higher Ed, he generates conversations, answers questions, and provides insight about a variety of "tech topics."  He has given presentations on social media and technology at multiple Student Affairs events (AACRAO, ACPA, ACUI, ACUHO-I, NACADA, NACAS, NACCU, NACS, and NASPA) and is a former regional chair of the NASPA Technology Knowledge Community.

Eric is a former Academic Advisor & Web Coordinator for the College of Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University. He served previously as a Marketing Specialist for Student Affairs at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He received an AA from Indian Hills Community College, a BA in Communications from the University of Northern Iowa, and an Ed.M. in College Student Services Administration from Oregon State University. Eric can be found online at http://ericstoller.com/ and tweeting at http://twitter.com/ericstoller/.

All opinions expressed in this blog are solely his own, and do not reflect the opinions of his clients or any organizations of which he is a member. Please contact Eric with any questions or comments.

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Most Recent Articles

October 6, 2011
To all the PR firms who are doing a great job of building relationships and sending out relevant pitches, I apologize. This post is not about you. This post is for two distinct audiences: PR firms that give PR a bad name and the companies that pay PR firms for atrocious PR tactics.
October 5, 2011
For the past few years, Twitter has been the source for breaking news. Last night, I started seeing several tweets that mentioned that Steve Jobs had died. Knowing that the Web sometimes spreads false rumors, I typed in Apple.com and saw that it was true. The Apple homepage was bereft of colorful imagery. The page read: Steve Jobs 1955-2011. An iconic black and white photograph of Apple's co-creator seemed like Steve's final touch. Simple. To the point. Functional.
September 26, 2011
In what I hope will be the first of many #SAtech (faculty) profiles,
September 21, 2011
Are we ready to support online learners? This is the question that I posed in a previous post this month. The answer, as read in the post comments, seems to be that we are not yet ready. So who is? Well, it turns out that a company in New York City might be stepping in to fill the void while student affairs figures out how best to support online learners.
September 19, 2011
Initially, I had planned on doing my best to write a balanced view of the money-making-machine known as the U.S. News & World Report College Ranking & Lists. For a prospective student, the ranking data contains information about tuition, total enrollment, acceptance rate, first-year student retention and 6-year graduation rates. I thought, well, at least there's some data that students can use even if the ranking numbers are a tad bit arbitrary and biased.
September 16, 2011
September 13, 2011
Initially, this post was going to be titled: "If you've ever sent "unsubscribe" to a listserv, please break the glass and read this post immediately." Unfortunately, that many words won't fit in our blog headers. Alternatively, I was debating whether or not I should include lemmings somewhere in this post as it seemed rather apropos. If you haven't already guessed, this post is all about listservs. While not a how-to per se, I have decided to write up a short treatise on that which seems to elude most listserv subscribers: the simple act of unsubscribing from a listserv.
September 5, 2011
Growing up in Iowa, the typical grocery store fruit options included: apples, bananas, pears, peaches, watermelons, and grapes. After a brief stint living in the Caribbean, I broadened my taste buds when it came to trying different types of fruit. In St. Lucia, I ate tamarind, mangoes, and coconuts. Trying new foods has always been something that I try to do when I can.

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