Joshua Kim

Dr. Joshua Kim is the Director of Digital Learning Initiatives at the Dartmouth Center for the Advancement of Learning (DCAL).  He has a PhD in demography and sociology from Brown University.  Josh can be reached by e-mail at joshua.m.kim@dartmouth.edu and by Twitter at @joshmkim.  Josh's CV can be found at joshmkim.com.

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Most Recent Articles

September 6, 2011
Last week I participated in a type of web meeting that I hope becomes the norm for academic / vendor coloration. The discussion was a "client-led Blackboard Mobile Learn Enhancement Requests," with participation from both the folks who run the Blackboard mobile division and clients (and prospective clients) worldwide. A discussion between academic clients (existing or potential) and a vendor is nothing unusual. Nor is it noteworthy to hold this discussion using web meeting tools. What I think was innovative, and worth repeating, was that this discussion was:
September 5, 2011
3 reasons to read Cathy Davidson's Now You See It: How the Brain Science of Attention Will Transform the Way We Live, Work, and Learn:
September 1, 2011
My Kindle is cannibalizing my media consumption. Not so much the Kindle device, which I look forward to Amazon making big improvements upon. It is more the Kindle ecosystem, specifically the ability to instantly purchase any newly published book for the cost of a softcover. This week I purchased Tom Perrotta's The Leftovers the day it came out ($12.99). No waiting the interminable 2 days for Amazon to ship the book.
August 31, 2011
Do you work with someone who works remotely? Do you have someone on your team who telecommutes full-time, or a significant part of each month? Are you working at a distance?
August 30, 2011
One of the (many) gifts of writing a daily blog is that I can no longer make the excuse, "sorry, I don't have any time for that". Really, if there is time for daily social media participation then there is time to participate in things FOR THE PEOPLE WHO PAY THE SALARY.
August 29, 2011
What fun books did you read this summer? Books that do not relate to education, learning, or technology? Books that do not help us re-invent, re-engineer, or re-mix higher ed? What fun book should we add to our late summer reading list? My list, in order of most recently read:
August 28, 2011
1. Your university will need more dorm space once you sell your leadership on the benefits of blended learning, as more students can be accommodated in classrooms, but they will all need a place to live. 2. Your office as a dorm room is suddenly a revenue generator. 3. Doing your daily work among the students, with your laptop at library tables and eating places etc, is a great way to make your work and presence visible to the campus community.
August 25, 2011
As the post Steve Jobs chapter begins at Apple, perhaps this a good moment to re-engage Apple's long and productive relationship with higher ed. Apple's mindshare in higher ed has probably never been greater. How many of you reading this column are doing so on an Apple product? In my world, the majority of students I see come through our doors carrying Apple laptops, and more often than not they also have an iPhone or an iPad. iTunes is a part of daily life, and iTunesU is probably the pre-eminent open education destination.
August 24, 2011
The mission of Saylor.org (which you can read in full here) is admirably ambitious:
August 23, 2011
E-readers will soon be commodities, with low margins and standard feature sets. Kindle, Nook, or whatever - e-book readers will compete on price (and they will be cheap). The value-add for Amazon, BN, (or maybe Google or Apple) will be driving book sales. A recommendation engine can do this to some extent ("Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought"), but algorithmically based recommendations will never be as persuasive as an editorial review. How do you decide what book to read next?

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