Joshua Kim

Dr. Joshua Kim is the Director of Digital Learning Initiatives at the Dartmouth Center for the Advancement of Learning (DCAL).  He has a PhD in demography and sociology from Brown University.  Josh can be reached by e-mail at joshua.m.kim@dartmouth.edu and by Twitter at @joshmkim.  Josh's CV can be found at joshmkim.com.

To reach this person, click here.

Most Recent Articles

April 25, 2011
I just got back from a week at Walt Disney World with my extended family. Less a vacation, and more of an epic quest to fully socialize the kids into being lifetime consumers of all things Disney branded (but I digress). My best day at Disney was spent largely in the Magic Kingdom's basement (actually the first floor, as the park was built over the first floor of a huge building that was built on a swamp), participating in the "Keys to the Kingdom Tour."
April 24, 2011
Tyler Cowen's The Great Stagnation: How America Ate All The Low-Hanging Fruit of Modern History,Got Sick, and Will (Eventually) Feel Better costs $3.99 and is concise. Amazon does not list the number of pages - maybe 100?
April 14, 2011
Two big pieces of news this week in ed tech. Earlier in the week we found out that Cisco is shutting down the Flip video camera division, two years after purchasing the company for $590 million.
April 13, 2011
I'm an intellectual urbanist who grew up in the suburbs (Brookline, MA) and lives in the country (Etna, NH). A politically pro environmentalist with a huge carbon footprint (big house, 2 big cars, drive to work etc.). A fan of density and public transportation, who lives on 10 acres and drives to work. A critic of our material obsessions and professional workaholic societal tendencies, but someone who along with his spouse seems to work all the time because work is so damn interesting (and because those large house mortgage payments aren't cheap).
April 12, 2011
The deal is that for $25 bucks less, or $114, Amazon will sell you a Kindle that displays "special offers and sponsored screensavers". Amazon promises to keep ads out of books, only showing the promotions on the bottom of the home screen and when the Kindle goes into screensaver mode.
April 11, 2011
I imagine that selling to educational institutions must be a challenge. We don't make decisions quickly. It is often difficult to identify the true decision maker. The consensus and collaborative culture of academic technology means that many people have a voice and veto, but only a few can green light (and fund) any purchase decision. Here are 6 guidelines that might assist tech companies planning to build a sales channel to the higher ed market:
April 10, 2011
2011 will be remembered as the year that the ed tech sector got hot. Venture capital firms will be making lots of small investments, and some large investments, in start-ups in the educational technology space. Kaltura, the media management and online video platform company, recently announced a third round of funding worth $20 million. This round was much bigger than previous venture investments of $2 million and $5.5 million.
April 7, 2011
How many people do you know who started their careers in academic libraries are now in leadership positions within academic computing? How many great educational technology folks that you have worked with have taken positions in libraries? The future of campus computing belongs to the librarians and the libraries, and that is a very good thing. Here is why:
April 7, 2011
It's about time a sociologist wrote an amazing and accessible book for a non-specialist audience. Everything Is Obvious: *Once You Know the Answer by Duncan J. Watts is that amazing book. For too long, the economists, psychologists, historians and evolutionary psychologists have owned the popular non-fiction category. No longer. Sociology is back!
April 5, 2011
Does a list of computers we've owned tell us anything meaningful about technology, business, or education? Not sure. Could you reconstruct a lifetime of computer ownership? Would be interesting to compare higher ed folks with people in other professions. Here goes: 1983 to 1987 - Kaypro 2 and Kaypro 4: High school. My first computer. About $1,500. Weighed about 30 pounds. The original portable, with an aluminum case, built in screen and floppy drives, and a detachable keyboard. MS-DOS (booted from the floppy) and WordStar.

Pages

Back to Top