Joshua Kim

Dr. Joshua Kim is the Director of Digital Learning Initiatives at the Dartmouth Center for the Advancement of Learning (DCAL).  He has a PhD in demography and sociology from Brown University.  Josh can be reached by e-mail at joshua.m.kim@dartmouth.edu and by Twitter at @joshmkim.  Josh's CV can be found at joshmkim.com.

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Most Recent Articles

December 2, 2010
I'm writing this post under the intoxicating influence of Kevin Kelly's "What Technology Wants". Blame Kelly for any hyperbole. (Are you also ridiculously influenced by whatever book you are currently reading? Why is it that books exert such gravity, so much more than visual media?)
December 1, 2010
Last week I had the pleasure to spend time with Fred Siff, Professor and CIO Emeritus University of Cincinnati, at a Richard N. Katz & Associates sponsored event. Fred led a discussion in which he asked, "Would you build a new 600 seat classroom today?" This was a great discussion starter, and I'm interested in what your answer would be.
November 30, 2010
I'm unsatisfied with the options for virtual book clubbing. This seems like a solvable problem. The place I go most is Visual Bookshelf, a Facebook App from LivingSocial. Visual Bookshelf shows that I have 36 reading friends reading 52 books, but almost nobody is active on the site.
November 29, 2010
I'm going to ask for 7 and 45 seconds of your time (believe me, I know this is asking for a lot). Please check out this video from the NYT's "Fast Times at Woodside High: How Technology is Distracting Students": Some questions: Are the students shown in the video representative of those students we will be seeing on our campus in the next few years?
November 28, 2010
Actually I only read Travels in Siberia, by Ian Frazier, Thanksgiving was in Virginia with my in-laws.
November 18, 2010
I like writing about ed tech companies, particularly startup companies and the products/services that emerge from innovation centers within established industries. Writing and teaching are the best ways to learn. A large chunk of the innovation in teaching, learning and educational productivity will come from companies. I've worked in a publishing / ed tech semi-startup (Britannica.com Education), and learned that companies are filled with educators who see market mechanisms at the fastest and most efficient manner to disrupt the higher ed status quo.
November 17, 2010
This week I had a chat with the founders of Eleven Learning, a Cambridge Mass based startup with ambitions to re-engineer the economics of the textbook market. Eleven Learning's goal is to create a structure in which costs are systematically engineered out of the textbook production process. The result will be not only lower costs, but a great diversity and variety of textbooks.
November 16, 2010
The next version of the Echo360 lecture capture system, EchoSystem 3.0, offers the ability to ingest and then play a wide range of externally produced media. According to the Echo360 press release, the EchoSystem 3.0 “will be generally available in December 2010”.
November 15, 2010
Today was the first time I used LinkedIn to develop a list of potential readers for a conference submission process that I’m working on. What a pleasure! Figuring out which networks to tap of tasks such as looking for volunteer readers or evaluators has always been a challenge. We end up going back to the people who have volunteered before, or people we connect with on a regular basis.
November 14, 2010
Ours is a vision of a transformed educational economy, one made possible by the invention of the web and the personal computer. To what extent, however, is the realization of a new educational order dependent on the companies that control the networks and the hardware of the Internet age? If the future of education will be increasingly be produced and delivered via the computer and the web, how likely is it that the values of the market will override the values of academy?

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