Joshua Kim

Dr. Joshua Kim is the Director of Digital Learning Initiatives at the Dartmouth Center for the Advancement of Learning (DCAL).  He has a PhD in demography and sociology from Brown University.  Josh can be reached by e-mail at joshua.m.kim@dartmouth.edu and by Twitter at @joshmkim.  Josh's CV can be found at joshmkim.com.

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Most Recent Articles

June 20, 2010
Will we ever get beyond e-mail as the main tool to manage our project communications? Everyone I know believes that e-mail is a terrible tool to keep track of all the tasks, to dos, milestones, decencies, and people related to projects. We are all overwhelmed by too much e-mail, and therefore likely to miss key communications related to our projects. E-mail makes it difficult to achieve a holistic view of the entire project process, forcing us to wade through numerous screens to see project communication.
June 18, 2010
Us learning technologist believe in choice. We push for educational content to "just work" on whatever screen our learners may want to access the materials. Videos should work on any OS, any browser, and any device. From Firefox to the iPad, curricular content should be device and platform agnostic.
June 16, 2010
I agree with all of Arthur Levine's conclusions in "Digital Students, Industrial-Era Universities." Our course designs, teaching methods, and institutional structures need to embody: --24/7 (anytime) --Location-free --Consumer-driven --Active learning --Concrete --New media --Learning (interactive) --Group (collaboration) --Breadth / gatherers
June 15, 2010
I'm reading Clay Shirky's amazing new book Cognitive Surplus: Creativity and Generosity in a Connected Age (have you downloaded it yet?), which has got me thinking about scarcity and course design. Shirky makes an argument that the transition from scarcity to abundance that publishing has experienced with the emergence of social media has increased the quality and diversity of ideas and discourse.
June 14, 2010
I've become enamored with tools that allow us to have rich, non-text based, communications with our students. If these tools also make communication and collaboration easier and faster than I'm doubly excited. The latest tool I've been using and recommending is ScreenFlow from Telestream. This is a Mac-only tool, so I'm hoping that someone will recommend something similarly wonderful for Windows.
June 13, 2010
Have you thought about having your students create voice-over presentations to share with your class? Instead of (or in addition to) having your students give live class presentations, a voice-over PowerPoint can be easily recorded and shared through the LMS. The 5 best things about using Jing, PowerPoint and the Discussion Board:
June 10, 2010
3 Reasons Why I Don't Want an iPhone 4: 1. Design: I love my Pantech Breeze, a phone that CNET describes as "ideal for the elderly as well as those with vision problems" (neither category that I've yet to enter). Seriously, I like a small clamshell phone that only does calling, with an occasional text message to my 12 or 13 year old.
June 9, 2010
It is not everyday that I recommend that you invest your precious time to go and read a vendor whitepaper, so I hope this time you will take my advice. Go to the Symtext home page and download their whitepaper “The New Learning: Digital and Post-secondary Education." Even if you have no interest in checking out Symtext, I think you will find this brief (6 pages) document thought provoking and informative.
June 8, 2010
One advantage of learning technology is it can help us close the gap between and idea and curriculum. When I first started teaching (in grad school in 1993) the task of finding teaching materials was extremely time consuming. I remember spending lots of time at the photocopy machine, transferring charts and graphs to plastic transparencies that I'd display in class with the overhead. Collecting VHS tapes to show video segments in class was a particular passion of mine - leading my (shared) grad student office that was cluttered with tapes.
June 7, 2010
I'm convinced that technology will provide the bridge between learning theory and teaching practice in higher ed. The gap between what we know and what we can actually accomplish is always large. For instance, we know that the best learning takes place in a seminar setting, with students and teachers sitting around a table and constructing knowledge through conversation, dialogue, and opportunities for active learning. The problem is that the resources do not exist to turn every class into a seminar, as the seminar method does not scale. Instead, we have lecture courses.

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