Libby A. Nelson

Libby A. Nelson has covered federal policy, Congress and religious colleges for Inside Higher Ed since April 2011. She previously worked as a reporter for The Times-Tribune in Scranton, Pa., and as an intern at the Chronicle of Higher Education, where she reported on the federal government in 2009 and 2010. While studying at Northwestern University, she worked as a reporting intern for the New York Times, the (Minneapolis) Star Tribune and the St. Petersburg Times. She graduated from Northwestern in 2009 with a degree in journalism. She is fluent in French.

Libby can be reached at 202.448.6117 or libby.nelson@insidehighered.com. She's also on Twitter at twitter.com/libbyanelson.

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Most Recent Articles

July 12, 2013
WASHINGTON -- A group of former presidents and chancellors of historically black colleges and universities have sent a letter to President Obama requesting more resources to make their institutions "comparable and competitive" with predominantly white colleges.
July 11, 2013
WASHINGTON -- The leading Republicans on the House Committee on Education and the Workforce and its higher education subcommittee introduced a bill Wednesday to repeal four controversial Education Department regulations -- including two that aren't currently being enforced.
July 11, 2013
Research officers warn of the long-term effects of federal budget cuts earlier this year.
July 10, 2013
A bipartisan group agreed late Wednesday on a change to federal student loan programs, basing interest rates on the market but including a cap.
July 10, 2013
WASHINGTON -- Eight days after the interest rate on new, federally subsidized student loans increased to 6.8 percent, the two parties in Congress seemed further away than ever on a compromise that could retroactively undo the increase.
July 8, 2013
The rise in subsidized student loan interest rates could increase overall indebtedness, but it's less clear what effect that will have on students' behavior.
July 8, 2013
WASHINGTON — The National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education has sent a letter to the Education Department protesting the appointment of another interim director for the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities rather than a permanent leader. The previous director, John Wilson, left in January to become president of Morehouse College.
July 5, 2013
WASHINGTON — After protests from historically black colleges that new underwriting standards for Parent PLUS loans have hurt their institutions, the Education Department has told colleges it will simplify the appeals process for students who are denied loans but stands by its new criteria. In a notice sent to institutions, the department announced it would create lists of applicants who are eligible to appeal loan denials and inform applicants by e-mail if they qualify. 
July 3, 2013
With two announcements, the Education Department begins to fill lingering vacancies on higher education policy.
July 3, 2013
A report issued Tuesday by Education Sector, a Washington, D.C. think tank, examines the federal government's three-year cohort default rate for federal student loans as well as alternative ways to measure how many students fail to repay their debt. The report, "In Debt and In the Dark," argues that current publicly available information on loan defaults is incomplete and doesn't represent students' total risk of default.

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Co-Authored Articles

June 13, 2012
Education Department releases its second annual compilation of most expensive colleges by sticker and net price, but this year, officials focus on the role state budget cuts have played in recent increases.
July 18, 2011
In deficit-minded times, student aid has already proven to be a potential casualty. As interest rates go up but need-based aid stays level, expect more of the same, experts say.
May 2, 2011
Research university group votes to discontinue U. of Nebraska's membership, and Syracuse plans to leave; officials at both universities say group's rankings define research excellence too narrowly.
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