Libby A. Nelson

Libby A. Nelson has covered federal policy, Congress and religious colleges for Inside Higher Ed since April 2011. She previously worked as a reporter for The Times-Tribune in Scranton, Pa., and as an intern at the Chronicle of Higher Education, where she reported on the federal government in 2009 and 2010. While studying at Northwestern University, she worked as a reporting intern for the New York Times, the (Minneapolis) Star Tribune and the St. Petersburg Times. She graduated from Northwestern in 2009 with a degree in journalism. She is fluent in French.

Libby can be reached at 202.448.6117 or libby.nelson@insidehighered.com. She's also on Twitter at twitter.com/libbyanelson.

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Most Recent Articles

April 30, 2012
WASHINGTON – The House of Representatives passed a bill Friday to keep the interest rate on federally subsidized student loans at 3.4 percent for another year, but President Obama threatened to veto the measure because it would cover the $6 billion cost of the extension by cutting money in the health care reform law for preventive care and public health. Obama has seized the student loan issue as the campaign for the general election begins in earnest, touring college campuses and calling on Congress to act to stop the interest rate from doubling to 6.8 percent in July. 
April 27, 2012
Simplifying the Free Application for Federal Student Aid would have little effect on eligibility for need-based state grants, according to a College Board study that could allay the concerns about relying only on Internal Revenue Service data -- not a more detailed listing of a student or parent's income and assets -- when awarding financial aid.
April 27, 2012
The Education Department just finished two rounds of negotiated rule making on financial aid issues -- one on student loan regulations and one on the rules that govern financial aid for teacher preparation programs -- but is already planning a third. The department will focus on creating new regulations to prevent fraud in financial aid programs, as well as possibly changing financial aid delivery to electronic funds transfers.
April 27, 2012
Obama will sign executive order requiring more disclosure to veterans enrolling in college, and cracking down on for-profits' recruiting practices.
April 26, 2012
As President Obama continued his barnstorming tour to campuses in key election swing states calling for Congress to stop the interest rate on federally subsidized student loans from doubling, several bills were introduced to do just that, including one from House Republicans. The key difference among the bills is how they would pay for an extension of the 3.4 percent interest rate, estimated to cost about $6 billion in the first year.
April 26, 2012
Several colleges have seen heightened tensions in recent months over how much church teachings should dictate college policies.
April 25, 2012
As President Obama began a three-state tour of college campuses, making a speech in North Carolina about the importance of keeping the interest rates for federally subsidized loans at 3.4 percent, House and Senate Democrats said they intend to introduce legislation today to stop the rate from doubling and pay for the extension by ending a tax break for self-employed.
April 24, 2012
President Obama has taken his call for Congress to extend the 3.4 percent interest rate on subsidized student loans to Iowa, North Carolina and Colorado -- all battleground states in this fall's election. But the presumptive Republican nominee Mitt Romney said during a press event Monday that he agrees with Obama, saying he supports an extension of the low interest rate, which would otherwise double for subsidized loans made after July 1. 
April 24, 2012
Occupy Student Debt, an offshoot of the Occupy movement focusing on student debt and urging students to pledge not to repay their loans if other borrowers join them, is planning several events Wednesday to commemorate the total amount of student debt passing $1 trillion.
April 23, 2012
The looming interest rate increase for subsidized student loans replays a familiar storyline: crisis, last-minute fix, another crisis. Meanwhile, the loans' future is in jeopardy.

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