Liz Reisberg

Liz Reisberg is an independent consultant in higher education, formerly associated with the Center for International Higher Education at Boston College. In the past she has worked in university administration at several universities and taught in the graduate program in higher education administration at Boston College.  Whe works with ministries of education, universities and international donor organizations throughout the world. Themes of her research and other activities include quality assurance in higher education, the challenges of access and equity, and new approaches to university curriculum and pedagogy. Much of her work has focused on Latin America.

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Most Recent Articles

June 10, 2013
There are too many countries with highly educated taxi drivers. Not that someone with a university degree shouldn’t drive a taxi but only if this is a choice, not employment for lack of any other. What is the alternative?
May 23, 2013
It is difficult to imagine a university today that does not have (or is not considering) a China strategy.  What is our preoccupation with China about?
May 15, 2013
Despite our presumption that the U.S. hosts the world’s best universities, we do not (or very soon will not) have the world’s best educated population.
February 25, 2013
The newest money-making scheme in China involves hiring professors from US universities to teach summer school so that Chinese students can earn US college credit in a short, cheaper class closer to home.  These for-profit schools have been established by US-educated 20-something Chinese familiar with both cultures and both systems.  Cheap US college credit without leaving home— a promising venture with large profit potential.  
January 20, 2013
Another overseas programs appears to be biting the dust. The University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV) is not renewing its contract with the Singapore Institute of Technology (SIT). This brings into question yet again why universities pursue these overseas ventures when they are rarely profitable and difficult to sustain.  
November 25, 2012
More than orientation for international students, institutions that welcome students from abroad need to consider international orientation for their professors and national students. We tend to put the burden of bridging the cultural divides on the international students — they are in a new country and expected to adapt. After all, they made a choice.  But when this accommodation moves in only one direction, much is lost.
November 14, 2012
Canada’s Waterloo University is shutting down after failing to make enrollment targets in Dubai at the same time that George Mason University is going to give it another go in Korea after a failed venture in the United Arab Emirates. What makes the desire for a foreign outpost so appealing?
October 8, 2012
It is too easy to forget that communicating is much more than words and that language is anchored in culture.  There are many words and phrases that simply do not translate and when people attempt to convey cultural concepts in a foreign language, meaning is often lost, or at least changed. 
September 18, 2012
Emory’s decision to shut down several programs should not be so shocking as it represents the trend in US higher education to follow, not lead, American society.  The decision reminds us that even established, prestigious institutions like Emory are not free from the influence of “the market”.  Although Emory’s decision is understandable on practical grounds, this should set off alarms for educators everywhere.  
August 30, 2012
Latin America remains locked into a content-laden notion of university education.  After all, universities in the region have a long tradition of preparing professionals. In many countries the university degree is equivalent to a professional license, making it more critical to stuff a student’s brain with as much discipline-specific knowledge as possible. This paradigm may have been effective during the last century, but is it still the best way to prepare future generations of university graduates?  

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