Marek Kwiek

Professor Marek Kwiek is director of the Center for Public Policy Studies at Poznan University, Poland. His research interests include European educational policies, public sector reforms, academic profession, and academic entrepreneurialism. He has published numerous papers and nine books, including The University and the State: A Study Into Global Transformations (Peter Lang, 2006). A partner in 20 international policy projects (for the European Commission, World Bank, Council of Europe etc.) and in 20 international research projects (the European Commission, European Science Foundation etc), he spent three years at North American universities as a visiting scholar. He has also been a Fulbright "New Century Scholar" and an editorial board member of Higher Education Quarterly and European Educational Research Journal.

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Most Recent Articles

March 17, 2013
Comprehensive reforms of Polish higher education and research systems started in 2010-2011. Their major part was the 2010 law on a new national research council called the “National Science Centre” (NCN). The rationale behind its establishment was twofold: to leave decisions about research funding for fundamental research to the academic community and to increase the competition for research funding. The competitive funding made available through the NCN will gradually lead to the emergence of a new class of Polish research-intensive universities.
April 1, 2012
More modern higher education and innovation systems alone would not drive economic competitiveness. There is a wide, although gradual bridging of the East/West gap related to a multitude of factors including tax systems, legal systems and transportation infrastructure. Knowledge production in universities in the region cannot be assessed in isolation from the larger economic environment. Higher education institutions cannot be held solely responsible for low economic competitiveness, and higher education reforms cannot be expected to bear economic results as quickly as policymakers in the region expect.  
October 18, 2011
The fall in enrolment levels in Poland expected for 2025 is the highest in Europe, and comparable in the OECD area only to Korea and Japan (OECD volume on Higher Education to 2030). In one scenario that Stéphan Vincent-Lancrin presents, enrolments in 2025 are expected to fall to 55% of the 2005 levels or dwindle by almost one million students. In Europe only Spain and Germany can expect decreases of significant magnitude by 2025 (Spain by 342.000 and Germany by 209.000).
July 24, 2011
  The power of large-scale international comparative research in higher education is increasing. Methodologically sophisticated surveys increasingly cover those territories of higher education about which, from international comparative perspectives, we used to have mostly guesses. Now we have hard data that can be used for research and policy purposes.
July 24, 2011
The power of large-scale international comparative research in higher education is increasing. Methodologically sophisticated surveys increasingly cover those territories of higher education about which, from international comparative perspectives, we used to have mostly guesses. Now we have hard data that can be used for research and policy purposes.
July 24, 2011
The power of large-scale international comparative research in higher education is increasing. Methodologically sophisticated surveys increasingly cover those territories of higher education about which, from international comparative perspectives, we used to have mostly guesses. Now we have hard data that can be used for research and policy purposes.
March 21, 2011
Anyone interested in the global growth of private higher education (PHE) should have a closer look at the last two decades in Poland. Poland is the 6th largest higher education system in the European Union (1.9 million students), with the largest student body and highest enrollment in the private sector (633.000 students and 33.3% in 2009). After twenty years of continuous growth, the sector suffered a 10% decline in enrollments in 2009.
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